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Madison line

Notes that President James Madison’s handwritten genealogy says that his great grandmother was Elizabeth Minor Tood. Argues that Minor was her maiden named, that Todd was a married name, and that, in any case, she was not the daughter of Thomas Todd.
Saturday, July 19, 2008
MADISONS OF COLONIAL VIRGINIA
 

MADISONS OF COLONIAL VIRGINIA(Revised) December 6, 2002By: Bob AllenSan Jose, CA Introduction This article

attempts to present the available documentary references of the Madisons of colonial Virginia. The primary focus is on John Mad(d)ison, the earliest known ancestor of James Madison, Jr., President of the United States, and his descendants down to the generation of Ambrose Madison, the proven ancestor of President James Madison, Jr. In some cases documentation from later generations is presented as supporting proof of facts related to the earlier ancestor(s). At the end of the article, records of yet-to-be connected Mad(d)ison of VA are presented.

The Madison family being examined had major connections with the Virginia counties of New Kent, King & Queen, King William and Caroline through the first ½ of the 18th Century. Most of the records concerning these counties was destroyed by fires in the 19th Century, mainly by a fire in Richmond set by the evacuating Confederates during the Civil War. This unfortunate destruction of records makes the research of the Madison family particularly difficult. Circumstantial evidence often is the only evidence available. One is required to make interpretations of the available evidence. This author has added his analysis to the records where it seems to this author that reasonable conclusions can be drawn from the records. The analysis is certainly subject to error. In some instances, this author’s analysis of the records differs from commonly accepted theories and points out, and hopefully corrects, some errors and misconceptions of the past. The opinions expressed in this article are the private opinions of the author and not necessarily the opinions of James Madison University. This is a work in progress and will probably remain so for the rest of this author’s life. It is the hope of this author that others will be able to add primary source documentation and analysis to bring the true facts more into focus. This author intends to make periodic revisions to this article if additional significant records are found, new or revised analysis can be made, and/or errors are identified and/or corrected. Lots of people have contributed information, documentation, analysis and argument over the years that have added to my level of understanding and knowledge of the Madison family for which I am grateful. I want to particularly identify and thank Margaret Amundson, CG, also a Madison descendant, for the records and abstracts of records and analysis that she has shared with me, without fee, that have significantly contributed to my level of information and some of my analysis presented herein.

 The most common first name in the early Madison family of colonial Virginia is John Madison. John Madison, the probable immigrant ancestor, had a son named John Madison and the son has a son named John Madison who are all discussed in this article.

 I have referred to them in my titles and analysis as John Madison, Sr., John Madison, Jr., and John Madison, III. If the title “Jr.” or “Sr.” is used in a documentary reference, I have used the designation included in the document, not the designation mentioned above. I also realize that the designation of “Sr.” and “Jr.” attached to persons of the same name in a particular county does not conclusively mean that they are father and son and this author has taken this into account in his analysis.

 John Mad(d)ison, Sr. 1. He was probably born in the first quarter of the 17th Century, probably in England. His wife was Mary __?__. They married about 1645. He may have been the John Maddison who appears in the York Co., VA, records between 1646-1648 (see below). He was definitely in VA by January 1653/54. He probably died in New Kent Co., VA, between 10 June 1678 (when he received a deed of 280 acres in (Old) Rappahannock Co., VA, from John Pigg) and 24 September 1680 (when his son, John Maddison, Jr., deeded this land to Thomas Williamson). Of particular interest is a

John Maddison who married Mary Tayler on 8 June 1645 in Witton-le-Wear, County Durham, England, because, as will be proven below, John Maddison, Sr., of Virginia had a wife named Mary, and his property in 1653 was adjacent to a Col. William Tayler/Taylor/Tayloe (husband by Elizabeth Kingsmill), a member of the Council of Virginia in the 1650s until his death about 1655. The Parish Register of Witton-le-Wear, Durham County, England, also has an entry for the Christening of two children of a William Tailer/Tailor, William Tailer who was Christened 9 March 1600/01 and Mary Tailor who was Christened on 3 October 1619. 2. On 4 January 1653/54 John Madeson received a land patent of 600 acres in Gloucester Co., VA on the North side of the Mattapony River, adjacent to Col. Taylor’s Creek and Adam Holland for the transportation of 12 persons to VA, including John Madison (Patent Book 3, page 217). 1. The apparent original or this land patent is located at the Alderman Library at the University of Virginia among the Baylor Collection (Accession No. 2257, Box 2, Legal Papers, 1653-1712). This patent says that it is based on (an order?) at James City on 12 day of March 1651/52. Below the land patent itself are several assignments apparently showing the ownership of this parcel of property. John Maddison and his wife, Mary, assigned the property to Thomas Jones on 24 Feb. 1659 (presumably 1659/60). Thomas Jones assigned the property to William Hurt on 10 May 1660. William Hurt and his wife, Margaret, assigned the property to William Nichalls (sic) on 3 Feb. 1682 (presumably 1682/83). “I John Mattison do authority to have sold unto Thomas Jones all my right and title of this land which is above Richard Davis and do bind myself and my wife Mary Mattison to acknowledging the same … as witness my hand this 24th of February 1659.” “John J M Mattison his mark” “Witnesses: William Hurt” “Teste … 1660 Acknowledged in Court by said Mattison.” /s/ “W. Claiborne, Sr.” (1) Note: Gloucester Co., VA was formed in 1651 out of York County, VA. New Kent Co., VA, was formed in 1654 out of York Co., VA, and a portion of Gloucester Co., VA, which contained the land involved in this 1653 land patent to John Maddison. (2) “Col. Taylor’s Creek” refers to the creek which divided the land of John Maddison and Col. William Taylor/Tayler/Tayloe, husband of Elizabeth Kingsmill, a member of the Virginia Counsel of State at his death, who died circa 1655 and who, before he died, sold his land to Anthony Arnold (See Land Patent Book 7, page 365). (a) This author believes the Col. Taylor Creek is now called Garrett’s Creek. 3. On 23 November 1653 John Mad(d)ison received a land patent of 80 acres (county not stated) on the Eastward side of Mandecoa (Mandin?) Creek (Patent Book 3, page 217). 1. Note: It is unknown where this land is located. This John Mad(d)ison is identified as John Maddison, Sr., because this land patent is on the same page of the Patent Book, immediately below the 4 January 1653/54 patent mentioned above. 4. On 28 Aug 1657 John Maddison received a land patent of 800 acres in New Kent Co., VA on the North side of the Mattapony River adjacent to his own 600 acres and Mr. Holland’s (Patent Book 4, page 112/166). Renewed 18 March 1662/63. 5. On 28 August 1658 John Maddison received a land patent of 300 acres in New Kent Co., VA on the North East side of the Mattapony River and the North side of Whorecock Swamp. (Patent Book 4, page 184/273). 6. On 22 July 1659 William Goffe received a 650 acre land patent in New Kent Co., VA on the North side of the Mattapony River behind Mr. Diggs. He assigned to John Maddison, who later assigned to Martha Goffe who patented the land on 18 Feb. 1663/64 (Patent Book 5, page 315/297). 1. This patent was deserted by Martha Goffe and the land was repatented by Phillip Watkins on 23 May 1673 (Patent Book 6, page 386), however, it appears as if the patent was never actually taken up by Phillip Watkins. This land was again repatented to John Prosser and deserted and sold to Robert Spencer on 28 September 1681 (Patent Book 7, page 118). 7. On 9 August 1659 John Maddison received a 300 acres land patent which was renewed on 18 March 1662/63 (see Patent Book 5, page 232/147). 8. In 1661 John Madison, John Pigg and Richard Evans received a 685 acre land patent (See Patent Book 8, page 141). 1. On 28 April 1691, 312 acres was patented to St. Stephens Parish for a Glebe (church), being a part of a 685 acres land patent to John Maddison, John Pigg and Richard Evans in 1661, John Maddison, having sold his part to the Parish, said parcel being adjacent to Mr. John Stark, George Godards, main Quintanockack Swamp, William Watts and Col. Abrahall’s line (Patent Book 8, page 141; Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Fleet, Vol. II, page 239-240). 9. On 18 March 1662/63 John Maddison received a 300 acre land patent in New Kent Co., VA on the North side of the Mattapony River, adjacent to John Pigg’s land, formerly granted to John Maddison on 9 August 1659 and is being renewed (Patent Book 5, page 232/147).

1. On 16 April 1683, John Maddison, Jr., received a land patent of 430 acres in St. Stephens Parish, New Kent Co., VA on the North side of the Mattapony River, adjacent to Robert Bagbie, John Miles, Mr. Chamberland, 300 acres of which was formerly granted to JOHN MADISON, SR., deceased, on 18 March 1662 (Patent Book 7, page 246). 10. On 5 May 1663 John Pigg “of Mattapony in the County of New Kent, planter” deeded 365 acres in (Old) Rappahannock Co., VA, on Draggon Swamp to John & George Mott. The witnesses were Anthony Arnell and Edward Eastam. John Pigg signed a Power of Attorney, appointing his “loving friend” John Maddison as his attorney in fact to acknowledge this deed for him in the (Old) Rappahannock County Court. The witnesses were Anthony Arnell and Joane Arnell. Recorded 10 (?) May 1663. 11. On 18 February 1663/64, John Maddison received a 280 acre land patent on (Old) Rappahannock Co., VA on the North side of a great branch of Peanketanck Swamp, adjacent to (2-1/2 miles from) Capt. Claybourne’s quarter and a path leading to Mr. Paynes of Rappahannock (Patent Book 5, page 655). 1. On 10 June 1675, John Pigg received a land patent of this same property in which it says that the property was formerly granted to John Maddison by Patent dated 18 __?__ 1663 and deserted and was then granted to Edward Hudson and by him deserted (Patent Book 6, page 554). 2. On 10 June 1678, John Pigg deeds this 280 acres to “John Maddison, Sen., of the Parish of St. Stephens in New Kent.” This deed describes the fact that this land was formerly patented by John Maddison and it lapsed and it was repatented to Edward Hudson and he deserted the land. Recorded in Rappahannock Co., VA on 12 July 1679. [(Old) Rappahannock Co., VA Deed Book 6, page 76] 12. On 4 July 1664 John Maddison received a 320 acre land patent in New Kent Co., VA, adjacent to Mr. Lockey and Richard Morley (Patent Book 5, page 223/131). 1. John Maddison sold this land to Isaac Collier sometime before 1683 and he deserted the land. It was repatented to John Easterly & Robert Clifford on 22 September 1683 (Patent Book 7, page 325). 13. On 4 July 1664 John Maddison and John Pigg received a 1050 acre land patent in New Kent Co., VA on the main swamp of Piantetanke (Patent Book 5, page 223/132). 1. On 28 April 1690, Phillip Lightfoot, Esqr., received a land patent of 525 acres in New Kent Co., VA. Anthony Arnold purchased of John Pigg, called Doctor’s Field on Draggon Swamp, being a moyety of 1050 acres granted to Pigg and John Maddison on 4 July 1664 (Patent Book 8, page 79) (1) Note: This land patent contains an interesting story about Anthony Arnold and how he forfeited all his land (and his life) for committing treason by being a co-leader of Bacon’s Rebellion. (2) On 22 June 1722 Edward Ware received a land patent of 815 acres in Stratton Major Parish, King & Queen Co., VA, on the South side of Dragon Swamp at the mouth of the Timber branch, adjacent to Dennis McCarty, Arthur Lett, John Lewis’s line, Richard Todd, 415 acres sold by Henry Madison to Nicholas Ware, father of Edward Ware in New Kent Co., VA by deed dated 29 November 1680, 20 acres was sold by James Martin to Edward Ware by deed dated 12 November 1700, and the remainder of 380 acres is surplus land in the patent to John Pigg and John Madison, father of Henry Madison, dated 4 July 1664 (Patent Book 11, page 106). (a) Note: Assuming that the 415 acres sold by Henry Madison on 29 Nov. 1680 was (part of) the Madison part of 4 July 1664 land patent to John Pigg and John Madison, it is possible that John Maddison, Sr., died prior to 29 Nov. 1680 and Henry Madison inherited this land from him. Of course, it is also possible that he acquired the property by deed from his father. 14. On 13 September 1664, John Maddison received a 200 acre land patent in Stratton Major Parish, New Kent Co., on the North side of the Mattapony River, adjacent to a dividend of land called “Tower Hill” belonging to Edward Lockey, Robert Bagby’s, Maddison’s land he now lives on and Whorecock Creek (Patent Book 5, page 372/408). 15. On 19 October 1666 John Maddison received a 350 acre land patent in New Kent Co., VA on the North side of the Mattapony River in a branch of Whorecock Swamp, adjacent to Richard Morlye’s, Mr. Lockey and Anthony Arnoll/Arnole (Arnold) (Patent Book 5, page 534/654). 1. Note: John Maddison probably abandoned this land (or sold it to somebody who abandoned it) prior to 1675 as on 2 March 1674/75 Collo. Robert Abrahall patented the same land and the patent describes the land as formerly granted to William Moore (Patent Book 6, page 554). This land was sold by Robert Abrahall to Joshua Story who patented it as part of a 400 acre land patent on 23 April 1688 (Patent Book 7, page 646). 16. On 29 April 1668, George Morris received a land patent of 860 acres in Stratton Major Parish, New Kent Co., VA, adjacent to John Maddison’s house and line, Anthony Arnold, John Exoll, Anthony Haines old line, formerly granted to Robert Abrall and John Pigg, George Morris purchased from Anthony Haines who purchased from the first proprietor, Capt. William Claiborne (Patent Book 6, page 274). 1. Note: The land patent is mentioned to show where John Maddison was living in 1668. 17. On 8 May 1674 John Maddison was a headright of George Morris who received a land patent of 3000 acres in Rappahannock Co. and New Kent Co., VA adjacent to Col. Goodrich and Mr. Henry Aubrey (Patent Book 6, page 516). Another headright was Edward Wheeler. 1. Note: It is unclear whether this references is to John Maddison, Sr., or to John Maddison, Jr., or possibly even a different John Maddison.

Children of John Maddison, Sr. 18. John Mad(d)ison, Jr., ship carpenter, was the son of John Maddison, Sr., born about 1655. He is referred to herein as “John Maddison, Jr.”. He married Isabella Minor (?Todd?) at an unknown time prior to the January 20, 1705/06 deed referencing John and Isabella as a couple.

President James Madison’s handwritten genealogy says that his grandfather was Ambrose Madison and that Ambrose Madison’s parents (and his ancestors) were John Madison and “Isabella Minor Todd”. If Isabella’s maiden name was Minor (see discussion in “a” below) and she was previously married to a Mr. Todd, then it is quite possible that John Maddison, Jr., was previously married too before he married Isabella and that John Maddison, Jr., had some children by his unknown first wife.

John Maddison, Jr., died sometime between the 16 June 1714 joint land patent to him and Daniel Coleman and 24 March 1725/26 when his son, John Madison, III, received a land patent of the Madison portion of the same land in which it refers to his father as being deceased. 1. Note: This author believes that Isabella Minor Todd’s maiden name was Minor, not Todd.[1] First of all, middle names were not in general use in VA in the 17th Century, and were even more uncommon for women than men. Therefore, it seems unlikely that Isabella had a middle name. Second,

President James Madison’s handwritten genealogy names his wife as “D. P. Todd.” It is well established that President James Madison married Dolly Payne, the daughter of John Payne and Mary Coles. Dolly Payne was previously married to John Todd before marrying James Madison, Jr. Yet when naming his wife in his chart he called her by her previous married name and only used an initial “P” for her maiden name. It would be consistent for him to have done the same with Isabella Minor Todd if she was a widow of Mr. Todd at the time of her marriage to John Madison, Jr. 2. Note: One expanded version of the account that says that Isabella’s maiden name was Todd also says that she was the daughter of Thomas Todd who died in Baltimore Co., MD in 1679, however, this Thomas Todd’s Will mentions 4 daughters, none of whom is Isabella (one is Avarilla). Although Isabella’s maiden name may have been Todd, it is highly doubtful that she was the daughter of this Thomas Todd who died in MD in 1679. 3. On 8 May 1674 John Maddison was a headright of George Morris who received a land patent of 3000 acres in Rappahannock Co. and New Kent Co., VA adjacent to Col. Goodrich and Mr. Henry Aubrey (Patent Book 6, page 516). Another headright was Edward Wheeler. (1) Note: It is unclear whether this reference is to John Maddison, Sr., or to John Maddison, Jr. 4. On 24 September 1680 John Madison, ship carpenter, of St. Stephens Parish, New Kent Co., VA, bargained and sold 280 acres of land in Farnham Parish, Rappahannock Co., VA, to Thomas Williamson, bounded on the South side of the Road and upon the branches of Peanchatanck and opposite from the land where said Williamson now liveth on and near or about a quarter of a mile from the land the said Williamson. Witnesses were John Pigg and Robert Clifford. Recorded 4 April 1683. [(Old) Rappahannock Co., VA Deed Book 7, page 26] (1) This is the land that was patented to John Maddison, Sr., on 18 Feb. 1663/64 mentioned above (that he deserted) and that was again sold to him by John Pigg on 10 June 1678. This entry proves that John Maddison, Sr., died between 10 June 1678 and 24 September 1680, thereby causing the land to come into the possession of John Maddison, Jr. There is no deed record in (Old) Rappahannock Co., VA, showing this land was deeded from John Maddison, Sr., to John Maddison, Jr., so the acquisition had to be by inheritance. (2) On 6 February 1682/83 John Maddyson, ship carpenter, signed a power of attorney to Henry Woodnut to go into (Old) Rappahannock Co., VA Court and acknowledge his (Maddyson’s) signature on the deed of 280 acres from John Maddison to Thomas Williamson dated 24 September 1680. The witnesses to John Maddison’s signature were John Colivow and Ann Collivoe (Collier?) This Power of Attorney was recorded on 17 April 1683. [(Old) Rappahannock Deed Book 7, page 27] (a) Note: The John Maddyson, ship carpenter involved with this 1682/83 deed is probably John Madison, Jr., (see below). (3) On 1 Feb. 1682/83 Thomas Williamson and his wife, Mary Williamson, deeded 142 acres (the upper part) of this 280 acquired from John Maddison “of the County of New Kent in St. Stephens Parish, ship carpenter,” to Randall Peters. This land is described as being opposite to the land where Thomas Williamson now lives. This deed was recorded on 4 April 1683. [(Old) Rappahannock Co., VA Deed Book 7, page 20] (4) Note: The Thomas Williamson land where he was said to have been living in 1680 could have been one or these two earlier land patents: (a) On 16 June 1663 Thomas Williamson and Evan Davis and Richard Lawrence received a land patent of 900 acres in Rappahannock Co., VA on the Eastward side of a head of a branch issuing out of the Mattapony Path, crossing Mattapony upper path (Patent Book 5, pages ___/199 & ___/471). (b) On 16 Dec. 1663 Thomas Williamson and Evan Davis received a land patent of 550 acres, no county given, on the South side of the Rappahannock River, adjacent to Cyprian Bushops (Patent Book 5, page ___/188). 5. On 23 April 1681 Edward Eastham received a 280 acre land patent in St. Stephens Parish, New Kent Co., VA, adjacent to Major Morris, Peter Dashafords, Mattison’s line, formerly granted to John Mattison and he sold to said Eastham on 8 April 1680 (Patent Book 7, page 76). (1) Note: If this former grant to John Maddison was to John Maddison, Sr., this wording suggests that John Maddison, Sr., was still alive on 8 April 1680 when he sold 280 acres of this land patent to Edward Eastham. 6. On 22 September 1682 Robert Chamberlaine received a 320 acres land patent in St. Stephen’s Parish, New Kent Co., VA on the North side of the Mattapony River on the branches of Horecock Creek, adjacent to land formerly belonging to John Maddison, deceased, William Moore, deceased, Arnoll, deceased, part formerly granted to Col. Robert Abrahall and John Pigg on 10 July 1658 and by Pigg sold to Morley from whom it escheated (Patent Book 7, page 187). (1) Note: This land patent proves that John Maddison, Sr., was dead by 22 Sept. 1682. 7. On 6 February 1682/83 John Maddyson, ship carpenter, signed a Power of Attorney to Henry Woodnut to go into court and acknowledge his (Maddyson’s) signature on his deed of 280 acres to Thomas Williamson dated 24 Sept. 1680. The witnesses to John Maddison’s signature were John Colivow and Ann Collivoe (Collier?) this Power of Attorney was recorded on 17 April 1683 [(Old) Rappahannock Co., VA Deed Book 7, page 27] (1) Note: This Power of Attorney proves that John Maddison, Jr., was the ship carpenter as he signed this Power of Attorney in February 1683, at least 6 months after the proven death of John Maddison, Sr. This means that John Maddison, Jr., was the one involved in the 24 September 1680 land patent above. If one assumes that John Maddison, Jr., was and adult when he deeded thos land to Thomas Williamson in 1680, he was probably born about 1655-1659. 8. On 16 April 1683 John Maddison and Richard Owen received a 100 acre land patent in St. Stephens Parish, New Kent Co., VA, adjacent to Edward Estham, Jacob Fleepo, Mantepike Path, Indian Path, Mr. Hansford, adjoining his own land (Patent Book 7, page 245). 9. On 16 April 1683 John Madison, Jr., received a 430 acre land patent in New Kent Co., VA on the North side of the Mattapony River, adjacent to Robert Bagbie, John Miles, Mr. Chamberlaine, 300 acres of which was granted to John Madison, Sr., deceased, on 18 March 1662 and 130 acres which was newly taken up (Patent Book 7, page 246). 10. In 1683 there is a Petition of inhabitants of St. Stephens Parish that was signed by many inhabitants of St. Stephen’s Parish (concerning the unsuitability of the vestry of St. Stephens Parish) that requested some governmental action to replace the vestry. The signers of this Petition included John Madison and James Taylor. (Source: Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Fleet, Vol. 2, pages 449-450). 11. Note: Now that it is proven that John Maddison, Jr., was the ship carpenter, it raises the interesting question of whether this John Maddison, ship carpenter, was the “mate/mariner” involved with the following 1685-1687 references concerning the ship called the “Betty”. (1)

In 1685 a John Maddison II was a mate on the ship “Betty” (or possibly “Rebecca”) which carried prisoners from Dorset County, England, to Barbados. The prisoners were convicted rebels who participated in Monmouth’s Rebellion in England. Other people connected with this transportation were George Penne, High Sheriff of Dorset County, England, John Penne Marcht. (merchant?), John May, Commander and Gabriell Whithorn, boatswain. [Early Virginia Immigrants, by Hotten, page __] (2) On 24 June 1687 Christopher Eastwick wrote his will, proved in Barbados 13 July 1687 in which he says John Maddison, mariner, is aboard the ship Betty of London now bound for Barbados, James Quiker master, Francis Gostwick chirurgeon. [Source: Barbados Records, Wills and Administrations, by Sanders, Vol. II, 1681-1700, page 103] 12. In June 1699, The Committee For Examining Claims to Land in Pamunkey Neck conceived that the following claims and titles to land in Pamunkey neck having their ground and foundation upon Indian leases are, ipso facto, null & void as being contrary to the ture intent and meaning of the Articles of Peace and to the 136th Act of Assembly in the Printed Book. But because it conduces much to the advancement of his Maj’ties interest and the peopleing of this his Maj’ties Colony that the said land should be held of the King and other, and because the several person claiming thereby have their immediate dependance thereupon and have made several improvements andhave a long continued & uninterrupted possession, this Committee therefore conceived that … a favorable grant thereof may be made to them in severally, Viz: - … John Maddison and Thomas Perring (Perry?), 600 acres. [English Duplicates of Lost Virginia Records, Louis des Cognets, Jr., (1958), page 57, 62] 13. On 23 October 1703 John Madison received a land patent of 300 acres in King William Co., VA on Upper Herring Creek, South East side of Perry’s Swamp (Patent Book 9, page 553). (3) John Maddison sold this land in 1706 to George Purchase (see below). (2) On 23 October 1703, James and Margaret Honey (late Margaret Dixon) patented 600 acres between Herring Creek on the north side of Machocomico Swamp a little below the bridge by Madison’s plantation, then on Hickman’s line. [Patent Book 9, page 558] (a) On April 15, 1704, James and Margaret Honey deeded 200 acres of this land to Mathew Sey (Seay) on the north side of Machocomico Swamp a little below the bridge to Madison’s new plantation. Recorded May 20, 1704. [King William Co., VA, Record Book 1, page 174] (b) On April 15, 1704, James and Margaret Honey deeded 200 acres of this land to Dennet Abney on the southeast side of Machocomico Swamp below the ridge road that goes to Mr. Madison’s Plantation, being a corner of Mathew Sey’s (Seay’s) land. The Witnesses were Samuel Williams, John Thomas and James Wood. Recorded on May 20, 1704. [King William Co., VA, Record Book 1, page 175] (b) On May 20, 1704, James and Margaret Honey deeded 200 acres of this land to Isaac Hill. Witnesses were John Hurt, Dennet Abney and Rice Williams. Recorded May 20, 1704. [King William Co., VA, Record Book 1, page 179] i. In 1721 Isaac Hill deeded this 200 acres to Joseph Hail. [King William Co., VA, Record Book 2, page 17] 13. On 23 October 1703 Henry Pigg received a 61 acre land patent in St. Stephens Parish, King & Queen Co., VA, adjacent to Maddison’s Mill Dam, Maddison’s Spring Bridge (Patent Book 9, page 555). 14. On 23 October 1703 John Madison received a land patent of 80 acres in St. Stephens Parish, King & Queen Co., VA, on the West side of Mantipike Road, a little below a school house, church road, along Baylor’s line (Patent Book 9, page 564). 15. The Virginia Quit Rent Rolls for 1704 contain the following Mad(d)ison entries: (1) Henry Maddison, 650 acres in King William Co., VA (2) Jno. Maddison, 500 acres in King & Queen Co., VA (3) John Maddison, 300 acres in King William Co., VA 16. On 20 January 1705/06 John Madison (and his wife Isabella) of St. Stephens Parish, King & Queen Co., VA sold 300 acres in King William Co., VA on Herring Creek to George Purchase. The witnesses were John Walker, Edward Eastham and Henry Webber. Isabella Madison signed a Power of Attorney on 21 January 1705/06 giving a Power of Attorney to Henry Madison to acknowledge her signature on the deed. The witnesses to the Power of Attorney were Edward Eastham and John Madison, Jr., (Source: Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Fleet, Vol. II, page 292). (1) Note: This is the first known reference to the fact that John Madison, Jr., was married to an Isabella. The “John Maddison, Jr.” who witnessed this Power of Attorney was probably the son of John Madison who was then married to Isabella who I am calling John Maddison, III. 17. On March 23, 1705/06, 2000 acres was surveyed for John Maddison and Henry Pigg on the Fork of the Mattapony River. A land patent for said survey to John Maddison and Henry Pigg was prepared and signed in October 1706. [English Duplicates of Lost Virginia Records, Louis des Cognets, Jr., (1958), pages 80-89] 18. On 26 April 1707, John Madison was appointed Justice of the Peace of King & Queen Co., VA. [English Duplicates of Lost Virginia Records, Louis des Cognets, Jr. (1958/1981), page 3] (1) Note: It is not certain whether this reference is to John Madison, Jr., or to his son, John Madison, III. It seems more likely to be a reference to John Madison, Jr. 19. In 1714, John Madison, was listed as a Justice for King & Queen Co., VA. . [English Duplicates of Lost Virginia Records, Louis des Cognets, Jr., (1958/1981), page 24] Also see pages 6 & 24 where John Madison is listed as Sheriff in King & Queen County in 1714. (1) Note: It is possible that a single John Maddison was both Sheriff and a Justice in King & Queen Co., VA, in 1714 at the same time. It seems more likely that these are two different person, probably father and son, with John Madison, Jr., probably being the Justice (a carryover from the 1707 reference) and John Madison, III, being the Sheriff (one year before his brother, Thomas Madison was appointed Sheriff). 20. On 16 June 1714 John Madison and Daniel Coleman of King & Queen Co., VA, received a land patent of 2000 acres in King William Co., VA on a fork of the Mattapony River, 4 miles above Doeg Town, by lands of Farrish, Pigg and May for importing 40 persons. [Patent Book 10, page 168] 21. On 16 Dec. 1714 William Lea received a 100 acre land patent in St. Stephens Parish, King & Queen Co., VA, on the west side of Mr. John Madison’s Mill Swamp on the North side of the Mattapony River, adjacent to John Taylor, Mrs. Ann Wiltshire & Thomas Camp (Patent Book 10, page 214). 22. On 1 April 1717 John Madison, John Rogers, Peter Rogers, Henry Pigg, Edward Pigg and John York received a land patent of 1860 acres in King & Queen Co., VA on a fork of the Mattapony River, 16 miles above inhabitants in King & Queen Co., VA (Patent Book 10, page 319) (1) It is unclear whether this reference is to John Madison, Jr., or to his son, John Madison, III. (2) Prior to 4 February 1726 John Madison sold at least 100 acres of his share to Peter Rogers prior to the death of Peter Rogers as Peter Rogers willed this share to Francis Smith of King & Queen Co., VA who sold the land to Edward Pigg of Spotsylvania Co., VA on 4 February 1726. 21. On 21 March 1722/23 a fragment of a deed from John Maddison to Richard Owen involving __?__ acres was recorded in King William Co., VA. The date of the deed itself or any description of the land is not included in the fragment. [Source: King William Record Book 1, page _?_; Virginia Colonial Abstracts, by Fleet, Vol. II, page 296] (1) Note: John Madison and Richard Owens received a joint land patent in 1683 in St. Stephen’s Parish, New Kent Co., VA. St. Stephen’s Parish never became part of King William Co., VA, so it is unlikely that the two transactions involve the same land. However, the connection between John Madison and Richard Owens suggest that it involves the same people. Since this document does not contain the date it was written, it cannot be certain that John Madison, Jr., was still alive when the deed was recorded on 21 March 1722/23. 19. Henry Maddison, born about 1659. His approximate date of birth is derived from that fact that he must have been age 21 when he deeded property to Nathaniel Hale in 1680. It is not known when after 1706 he died. The 1722 reference to him in the Edward Ware land patent does not say that he is deceased. 1. On 8 August 1671 there is a record of 3999 pounds of Virginia tobacco arriving in England on the ship “Suzan” which was shipped by Henry Maddison and Co.[Virginia Colonial Records Project, Virginia State Library, Survey Report No. 3779, page 22] (1) Note: It is unclear whether this Henry Maddison and Co. was located in Virginia or England. This Henry Maddison (assuming that he was still living), is perhaps too old to be the Henry Maddison, son of John Maddison, Sr. b. On 29 November 1680, Henry Madison, son of John Madison, sold 415 acres in Stratton Major Parish, New Kent Co., VA, to Nicholas Ware (see Patent Book 11, page 106). John Madison, father of Henry Madison received this land as a joint land patent with John Pigg on 4 July 1664 (see Patent Book 5, page 132). c. On June 1699, The Committee for Examining Claims to Land in Pamunkey Neck, etc., finding that the Pamunkey Indians, by the Articles of Peace made at the Middle Plantation on 29 May 1677 confimed land in the Pamunkey Neck to said Indians. The Indians sold or leased out some of this land to British settlers in VA (which they had no power to do). Said land was vacated by the Indians and fell back into the ownership of the King of England. There was a recommendation of the Committee to give the right of first refusal to purchase this land to the British settlers would had purchased of leased the land from the Indians. The Committed report that the following claims … issuing out of former grants and patents ought to be confirmed to the several Petitioners: Henry Madison, 270 acres purchased formerly of Mr. Samuel Oustin and afterwards confirmed by Mr. Richard Littlepage, being land formerly patented. [English Duplicates of Lost Virginia Records, Louis des Cognets, Jr., (1958), page 57-60] d. In 1701 an inventory of the the munitions of King & Queen Co., VA., was taken and certain munitions were listed as being at the residence of Mr. Henry Madison in King & Queen County. [Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Fleet, Vol. II, page __] e. On 12 March 1701/02 Henry Madison, Justice, signed a Petition of Inhabitants of King & Queen Co., VA, to the King giving him support and opposing the French King who his unduly taking upon himself to set up the pretend Prince of Wales for King of England [Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Fleet, Vol. II, page 229; Public Records Office, Great Britain, London, Colonial Office t, Vol. 1312 – Part II] 5. On 8 July 1702, Henry Madison was listed as a Justice in King William Co., VA. [English Duplicates of Lost Virginia Records, Louis des Cognets, Jr., (1958), page 14] f. On 20 August 1703, Richard Littlepage deeded 240 acres of Land to Henry Madison where said Madison … seated a quarter within the Court of King William, Parish of St. John, is measured according to said Littlepage’s desire and laid out by Collo. James Taylor and is bounded by the Miery Branch, John Osteen, John Williams, “on a hillside by Henry Madison’s fence side,” George Pemberton. [King William Co., VA, Records 1702-1705, page 118] (1) Frances Littlepage’s Power of Attorney appointing William Aylett to acknowledge her signature and released her dower right to this deed/land says that the deed was dated 20 August 1702. [Ruth and Sam Sparacia, comps., King William County, Virginia Record Books 1702-1705, page 81 (McLean, VA: The Ancient Press, 1996)] (2) On 12 May 1702, John Hill, Jr., and Jane Hill (formerly Mrs. John Drummond) deeded 286 acres in St. John’s Parish, King William Co., VA, to John Walker. 180 acres of this deed was formerly sold by Richard Littlepage, executor for the estate of Samuel Osteen, deceased, to Jane Hill’s former husband (John Drummond) by deed dated 20 October 1683. This 180 acres was adjacent to Col. Thomas Pate, John Arkles and John Pemberton. 106 acres of this deed was part of a dividend formerly belonging to Samuel Dean and sold by him to John Arkles and by him sold to Roger Mallory and by him sold to John Drummond, father-in-law to said Jane Hill. This 106 acres is adjacent to Mr. Samuel Osteen’s head line, John Randall’s corner tree, Myory Branch “to a red oak corner tree standing upon the high land, and thence northeast half east by a line of marked trees which divides this land from Henry Mattison’s land to the place it first began” (a red oak corner tree standing by the hear of a branch of the Mattaponi River). Recorded 20 August 1702. [King William Co., VA, Record Book 1, page 3] (3) In 1702-1703 (date obliterated), Richard Littlepage deeded land to Henry Fox that mentions “said Madison’s line north sixty nine degrees west ninety eight poles to a corner Spanish oak tree on a hill, another corner of said Madison’s thence keeping with the said Madison’s line North nine degrees west forty seven poles to Henry Burch’s corner shrub on a hill side….” [Ruth and Sam Sparacia, comps., King William County, Virginia Record Books 1702-1705, page 60 (McLean, VA: The Ancient Press, 1996)] (4) On 20 January 1702/03, Richard Littlepage deeded 155 acres in St. John’s Parish, King William Co., VA, to John Williams adjacent to the south side of Johns Creek, Rowling Road standing in Mr. Robert Payte’s line, George Pemberton line, Mr. Henry Maddison’s standing on the west side of ye Rowling Road by said Maddison’s now plantation, Austin’s (Osteen’s?) line on the head of Pasture Spring Branch, formerly Samuel Osteen’s land and given to Richard Littlepage by his Will. Recorded 20 November 1702. [King William Co., VA, Record Book 1, page __] (a) In November 1722, John Williams sold 155 acres of this land to William Lipscomb and John Lipscomb, adjacent to Rowling Road, Robert Pate, George Pemberton, “to a corner red oak of Mr. Henry Madison’s standing on the west *** by the said William’s new plantation, formerly so called, thece at *** Madison’s line south twenty nine degrees west fifty four poles to *** corner tree of the said Mr. Henry Madison’s and John Austin”s standing *** Madison’s fence side formerly,”, Austin’s line, Spring Branch and Jacks Creek. Recorded __ November 1722 [King William Co., VA Records, 1721-1722, page ___] (5) On 20 January 1702/03, Richard Littlepage deeded ___ acres to George Pemberton, adjacent to Col. Pate, John & Jane Hill, “Henry Madison’s line south east 93 chains to a marked *** red oak corner.” [King William County, VA., Record Book 1, page 74] (a) Note: There is some mention of “The Husband” that has been in this author’s opinion incorrectly interpreted as “Tho. Husbands”. Instead, it is this author’s opinion that this refers to the John and Jane Hill patent in which the land was previously sold by Richard Littlepage to the father of Jane Hill’s former husband, John Drummond. Thus this author concludes that the adjacent landowner was John & Jane Hill. (6) On 20 August 1703, Richard Littlepage deeded 295 acres to John Austin (Osteen?) in King William Co., VA, adjacent to Mr. Henry Fox, Jacks Creek, said Osteen’s, “Mr. Henry Madison’s corner dogwood on a hill, thence north sixty nine degrees east along the said Madison’s line 250 poles to a great red oak on a hill by said Madison’s fence side *** a corner of John William,.” head of the Pastures Spring Branch. [King William Co., VA, Record Book 1, page 120] g. Henry Maddison was listed in the 1704 Quit Rent Rolls as owing 650 acres in King William Co., VA. (1) Note: Henry Madison seems to have owned at least one other parcel of land in King William Co., VA besides the 240 acres deeded to him by Richard Littlepate in 1703. h. On 20 January 1705/06 John Madison (and his wife Isabella) of St. Stephens Parish, King & Queen Co., VA sold 300 acres in King William Co., VA on Herring Creek to George Purchase. The witnesses were John Walker, Edward Eastham and Henry Webber. Isabella Madison signed a Power of Attorney on 21 January 1705/06 giving a Power of Attorney to Henry Madison to acknowledge her signature on the deed. The witnesses to the Power of Attorney were Edward Eastham and “John Madison, Jr.” (Source: Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Fleet, Vol. II, page 292). i. On 22 June 1722 Edward Ware received a land patent of 815 acres in Stratton Major Parish, King & Queen Co., VA on the South side of Dragon Swamp at the mouth of the Timber branch, adjacent to Dennis McCarty, Arthur Lett, John Lewis’s line, Richard Todd, 415 acres sold by Henry Madison to Nicholas Ware, father of Edward Ware in New Kent Co., VA by deed dated 29 November 1680, 20 acres was sold by James Martin to Edward Ware by deed dated 12 November 1700, and the remainder of 380 acres is surplus land in the patent to John Pigg and John Madison, father of Henry Madison dated 4 July 1664 (Patent Book 11, page 106). Children of John Maddison, Jr. 21. John Madison, III, born between 1680-1686. Other accounts place his date of birth about 1696, but this cannot be correct if he is the “John Madison, Jr.,” who witnessed the signature of Isabella Madison (his mother?) on her Power of Attorney connected with the January 1705/06 deed and who was appointed a gentleman justice in King & Queen Co., VA, on 26 April 1707. This author is not sure whether a person needed to be age 21 to witness a deed. If he did, he was born no later than 1685. If he could be under age 21 to witness a deed, this author assume that he must have at least been age 16. 1. On 26 April 1707, John Maddison was appointed a gentleman justice of King & Queen County Court. [English Duplicates of Lost Virginia Records, Louis des Cognets, Jr., (1958), page 3] (2) Note: It is not certain whether this reference is to John Madison, III or to his father. It seems more likely to be a reference to his father, John Madison, Jr. 2. On 28 April 1714, John Maddison was appointed Sheriff of King & Queen County. [English Duplicates of Lost Virginia Records, Louis des Cognets, Jr., (1958), page 6 and 24; also see page 24 where John Madison is on a list of gentlemen justices of King & Queen Co., VA] (2) Note: It is possible that a single John Maddison was both Sheriff and a Justice in King & Queen Co., VA, in 1714 at the same time. It seems more likely that these are two different person, probably father and son, with John Madison, Jr., probably being the Justice (a carryover from the 1707 reference) and John Madison, III, being the Sheriff (one year before his brother, Thomas Madison was appointed Sheriff). 3. On 1 April 1717, John Madison, John Rogers, Peter Rogers, Henry Pigg, Edward Pigg and John York received a land patent of 1860 acres in King & Queen Co., VA on a fork of the Mattapony River, 16 miles above inhabitants in King & Queen Co., VA (Patent Book 10, page 319) (1) Note: Prior to 4 February 1726 John Madison sold at least 100 acres of his share to Peter Rogers prior to the death of Peter Rogers as Peter Rogers willed this share to Francis Smith of King & Queen Co., VA who sold the land to Edward Pigg of Spotsylvania Co., VA on 4 February 1726. 4. On 20 Feb. 1719 “John Madison, Jr., Esq.,” of King & Queen Co., VA patented 400 acres on both side of the north fork of the South River in St. Margaret’s Parish, King William Co., VA (later to become Caroline Co., VA), adjacent to John Hubbard. [Patent Book 11, page 3] 5. There is a Bible record of John Camm and Mary Bullock. They were married on 22 May 1722. They had a daughter, Mary Camm, born 15 October 1725. She was baptized by Rev. Mr. Brunskill who was the reverend of the glebe of St. Margaret’s Parish, King William/Caroline Co., VA, One of the Godparents mentioned were John & Ann Madison. (1) The Wills of John Camm (1766) and his daughter, Ann Camm Cluverius Pollard Booker, (1775) mention a daughter of Ann Camm Cluverius Pollard Booker, Mary Madison (whose maiden name is presumed to be Cluverius because she is mentioned in the Wills just after Benjamin Cluverius and just before the three minor Pollard children), who married John Madison, and who were both living in 1766 and 1775. This John Madison was possibly related (?son or grandson?) of John Madison and Ann __?__, the above-mentioned Godparents. 6. On 24 March 1725/26 John Madison, Gent., of King & Queen Co., VA received a 2150 acre land patent in St. Margaret’s Parish, King William Co., VA, between the main river of Mattapony and the North side of the South River in St. Margaret’s Parish, adjacent to John Maye just below an island, lower corner of Coleman’s and John Madison, deceased, father of said John Madison, 1000 acres being part of 2000 acres granted to John Madison, Sr., deceased and Daniel Coleman by patent dated 16 June 1714, 1150 acres being surplus land found within the bounds of said Madison’s part of said patent (Patent Book 12, page 390).

 (1) Note: This reference proves that John Madison, Jr. died between 16 June 1714 when he was alive to patent the joint patent of this same land with Daniel Coleman and 24 March 1725/26 when this patent reports him as deceased.. (2) Note: Most, if not all, of St. Margaret’s Parish became part of Caroline Co., VA, at its formation in 1727. (3) Note: The John May land adjacent to this parcel was the John May portion of the 2000 acre land patent to Robert Farish, John Pigg and John May on 23 Dec. 1714 (Patent Book 10, page 225). This 1714 land patent was at the mouth of the South River when it hits the Mattaponi River on the north side of the South River and the southwest side of the Mattaponi River as they separate. John Baylor purchased the John Pigg portion of this land patent. 7. On 28 September 1728 (Capt.) John Madison of King & Queen Co., VA, received a land patent of 1000 acres in Spotsylvania Co., VA, at the foot of a great mountain, adjacent to Capt. John Camms and George Taylor, James Madison and Erasmus Taylor (Patent Book 13, page 350).

(1) On 4 November 1734 John Madison of Drysdale Parish, King & Queen, Co., VA, deeded 1000 acres in St. Mark’s Parish, Spotsylvania Co., VA, to his niece, Elizabeth Madison, eldest daughter of my brother, Ambrose Madison, lately deceased, which was the 1000 acres which he patented on 28 September 1728 on the condition that upon her deceased that 200 acres be deeded to Francis Williams in fee simple. [Spotsylvania Co., VA, Deed Book C, page __] (2) Note: One of the key unanswered questions is whether the John Madison, Gent., “of King & Queen County” who received the above land patent in St. Margaret’s Parish, King William Co., VA, in 1725/26 was the same John Madison “of King & Queen County” involved in these 1728 and 1734 deeds. 22. Elizabeth Madison, born abt. 1685. Her existence is probable, with this approximate date of birth based on the following factors: 1. On 4 January 1653/54 John Madeson received a land patent of 600 acres in Gloucester Co., VA, on the North side of the Mattapony River, adjacent to Col. Taylor's Creek and Adam Holland for the transportation of 12 persons to VA, including John Madison (Patent Book 3, page 217). This land became part of New Kent Co., VA when that county was formed in 1654. There is what seems to be the original of this land patent that is among the records of the Baylor Collection at the Alderman Library at the University of Virginia. It shows various assignments of ownership on this property. It shows that John Madison assigned this property to Thomas Jones on 24 Feb. 1659/60. A witness was William Hurt. It shows that Thomas Jones assigned this land to William Hurt on 10 May 1660. William Hurt and Margaret, his wife, assigned this land to William Nichalls on 3 February 1682/83. All this time John Madison also owned an adjoining parcel of 800 acres that he patented on 28 August 1657 in New Kent Co., VA (Patent Book 4, page 112/166). William Hurt and Margaret were the parents of Isabella Hurt who was the wife of Phillip Pendleton who parented Catherine Pendleton, wife of John Taylor (b. 1696). 2. There is a John Penn, ancestor of this author, who was born about 1680 who is proven to have died in Caroline Co., VA, in 1741. There is a Caroline Co., VA, Court Order Book reference in 1741 to the Will of John Penn being proved in Court by Elizabeth Penn and Moses Penn, co-executors named in the Will. It is assumed that Elizabeth Penn was his widow and Moses Penn was his son. This John Penn was the father of four sons, John Penn, Jr., George Penn, Joseph Penn and Moses Penn. The two oldest sons, John Penn, Jr., and George Penn were born very close to 1700. These two older Penn children, John Penn, Jr., and George Penn, received a joint deed from Thomas Chew in Spotsylvania Co., VA in 1727. John Penn, Jr., married in the mid to late 1720s and George Penn married in 1735. 3. An Elizabeth Penn was named as the Godmother to the baptisms of two of Ambrose Madison’s children: James, who was baptized on 21 April 1723, and Frances, who was baptized on 9 April 1727. Almost all of the Godparents of Ambrose Madison’s children are proven Madison relatives or relatives of his wife, Frances Taylor. Frances Taylor was the child of James Taylor, Jr., and Martha Thompson and the grandchild of James Taylor, Sr., (d. 1698 in King & Queen Co., VA) and his first wife __?__ (some accounts say that his first wife was Frances? Walker?). If Elizabeth was a Taylor, she would have been the daughter of James Taylor, Sr., and his second wife, Margaret Gregory. There is a Bible record of the children of James Taylor, Sr., and both wives and it does not mention a child Elizabeth. Other accounts of the children of James Taylor mention a daughter Elizabeth who died young. In either case, this seems to eliminate Taylor as Elizabeth’s (the Godmother’s) last name. 4. George Penn was a witness to the Will of Ambrose Madison in 1732. 5. There is an account book of Ambrose Madison for the years 1726 and 1727 located in the Shane Collection of the Presbyterian Historical Society in Philadelphia, PA. It has an alphabetical listing of all the people who Ambrose Madison did business with. The listing includes John Penn, Sr., John Penn, Jr., George Penn, Col. James Taylor, John Taylor, James Taylor, Jr., William Taylor, Capt. John Madison (one list), John Madison (other list, quite possibly the same as Capt. John Madison), Isabell Madison and Thomas Madison. (f) By deductive reasoning, Elizabeth Penn, the Godparent, was probably Elizabeth Madison and was probably the wife of John Penn who died in Caroline Co., VA in 1741. If so, her date of birth would have been circa 1685.[2] 23. Thomas Madison, born no later than 1694 1. Thomas Maddison was appointed Sheriff of King & Queen Co., VA on 25 April 1715. [H. R. McIlwaine, ed., Executive Journals of the Council of Virginia, Vol. III (May 1, 1705-October 23, 1721), 1979/1986; English Duplicates of Lost Virginia Records, Louis des Cognets, Jr., (1958), page 6] (1) Note: It is assumed that Thomas Madison had to be age 21 to be appointed Sheriff. It is also assumed that by “Sheriff” it is meant, deputy sheriff or under sheriff. This record is what sets his date of birth at 1684 or before. 2. On 11 July 1719, Thomas Madison of King William County received a land patent of 330 acres in St. John Parish, King William Co., VA, adjacent to the land of John Mays, Coleman, Rice Williams and Robert Hines (Patent Book 10, page 428). 3. Thomas Madison was named as a Godfather in the Ambrose Madison Bible for James Madison, son of Ambrose Madison and Frances Taylor, who was born on 27 March 1723 and was baptized on 21 April 1723. 4. On 13 October 1727, John Martin received a land patent of 400 acres in St. John Parish, King William Co., VA, on the branches of the Middle River and White’s Run, beginning at the corner hickory and white oak at Thomas Madison’s corner in a valley in Robert Hinds line. Other adjacent owners were Henry Pigg and John Coleman and John Martin’s upper tract. [Patent Book 13, page 190] 5. On 31 August 1741, Duncon Bohannon of Caroline Co., VA, planter, and Susanna his wife, deeds 342 acres located in St. Margaret’s Parish, Caroline Co., VA, to John Baylor of Caroline Co., VA, Gent., land whereon Doncon Bohannon now live, adjacent to Thomas Madison, by side branch, side of a pond, land or Roger Maddison, line of John Baylor, John Pickett’s corner. This deed was witnessed by Joseph Morton, Thomas Chew, George Taylor and Frances Conway. This deed is part of an exchange of land from John Baylor to Duncan Bohannon located in Orange Co., VA. This copy of the deed was recorded in Orange Co., VA [Orange Co., VA Deed Book __, page ___; Dorman, comp., Orange County, Virginia Deed Books 5-8, 1741-1743 (Washington, D.C., Privately Printed 1971) (1) Note: It appears that Duncan Bohannon married Susanna May, daughter of John May. It appears that this land deeded to John Baylor was the John May portion of the 2000 acre land patent to Robert Farish, John Pigg and John May on 23 Dec. 1714 (Patent Book 10, page 225). John Baylor had previously purchased the John Pigg portion of this 1714 land patent. 6. Caroline Co., VA, was formed from Essex Co., King William Co., and King & Queen Co., VA in 1727. It is unclear to this author when the first Court was actually held in Caroline Co., VA. There are Court Order Books for Caroline Co., VA beginning in 1732 that survived destruction by fire during the Civil War. Thomas Madison first appears in the Court Order Book on 9 March 1732/33 in which Thomas Madison, Robert Woolfolk, Robert Farris and Thomas White were ordered to appraise the estate of Benjamin Row. The last entry is on 10 July 1755 when the Inventory of the estate of Thomas Madison is admitted to record. Many references to Thomas Madison appear between these two dates showing that he remained a resident of Caroline Co., VA, from 1732/33 until his death in 1755. Some of the most relevant references are as follows: (1) On 10 January 1734/35 Robert Farish, Thomas Madisson, George Tripple and Thomas Coleman were ordered to appraise the estates of John May and Benjamin Downer. (2) On 10 September 1736, it was ordered that Thomas Madison, George Trible, George Eastham and John Ellis view the main road between the main river and South River and return their proceedings. (3) On 11 May 1739, Thomas Madison was ordered to survey the road from the South River Bridge to the Chapel. (4) On 12 March 1741/42, it was ordered that Thomas Maddison, Henry Harris and Benjamin Wood view and lay off the most convenient way for a road from the place where the new church is to be erected into the the road by Richard Hewlett’s. Also on the same date, regarding a road to be surveyed from the “Shop” to Sutton’s Ford, it was ordered that John Ellis, Augustine Ellis, John Madison[3], James Samuel, George Chapman, Thomas Walker, John Hubbard, Anne Walker, John Shirley, William Emerson, John Jarrell, Christopher Eccoff, Robert Standfeild, Thomas Madison, Henry Harris, George Martin, James Coleman, Joseph Stevens and Robert Johnston with their people assist the surveyor in clearing the road and keep the same in repair. (5) On 9 April 1742, Thomas Madison was ordered to receive 75 pounds of tobacco for repairing the South River bridge. (6) On 8 November 1744, Thomas Madison, John Pickett, Benjamin Wood and James Dismukes were ordered to appraise the estate of Henry Harris. (7) On 9 October 1747, Thomas Madison, Benjamin Wood, John Pickett, Jr., and James Dismukes were ordered to appraise the estate of John Whimsel. (8) 12 October 1750, a County Levy was ordered to pay Thomas Madison for repairing South River Bridge. (9) On 14 December 1750, it was ordered that Rice Curtis, Thomas Madison, Thomas Walker and Samuel Haws settle an account of the administration of John Hubbard’s estate and divide the same, except specific legacies, between the widow and all the children. (10) On 8 February 1750/51, it is ordered that James Martin, Thomas Madison, Thomas Walker and Samuel Haws appraise the estate of John Hubbard. (11) On 8 March 1750/51, it is ordered that Thomas Buckner, Gent., William Buckner, William Bowler, Thomas Madison and Roger Madison, set apart Ruth Trice’s late Ruth Booth’s dower of the estate of Daniel Booth. (12) On 13 September 1751, Abraham Estes was ordered to pay Thomas Madison and Roger Madison a witness fee for testify for him in a court case. (13) On 14 May 1752, John Woolford, James Riddle, James Desmukes and Thomas Madison gave depositions in court to establish the Will of Thomas White. (14) On 14 December 1752, it was ordered that Robert Farish, James Dismukes, Thomas Madison and James Terrell appraise the estate of Thomas White. (15) On 16 December 1752, Thomas Madison, James Dismukes, James Coleman and James Martin were added to others who were formerly ordered to divide the lands of Benjamin Walker amongst all his children according to the decree of the General Court. (16) On 13 December 1753, Peter Copland, Gent., Thomas Madison and James Dismukes were appointed to agree with workmen either to repair or rebuild South River Bridge. 7.

The Thomas Madison Family Record as recorded in the appendix of a book entitled Reminiscences of Eastern Oregon, by Mrs. Elizabeth Lord (1903) by The Irwin-Hodson Co., Portland Oregon, page 231. It seems as if this information would have been taken from a Bible record, but this is not revealed in the book. “Thomas Madison died January 20, 1754; Joanah, his wife, died April 13, 1758. Their children were J. Madison[4], born October 26, 1719. Ambrose Madison, born March 11, 1724. Jane Madison, born February 11, 1728; died October 24, 1767. Humphrey Madison, born April 25, 1730; died September 12, 1756 Ann Madison, born July 31, 1733. Sarah Madison, born February 29, 1735; died October 31, 1801. Mary Madison, born May 15, 1738. George Madison, born October 7, 1740. Roger Madison, born April 15, 1744; died September 12, 1768. Elizabeth Madison, born May 30, 1747.” Note: The birth date of his first child in 1719 suggests a marriage date in 1717-1718. Sarah Madison, the daughter of Thomas Madison above, married on November 27 1755, Thomas Laughlin who was born in England and came to America early 1700s; he died December 13, 1801 and apparently is the lineage of Mrs. Elizabeth (Laughlin) Lord. 24.

 Ambrose Madison, son on John Mad(d)ison, Jr. and Isabella __?__ (Minor? Todd?) was born no about 1696. He married Frances Taylor, daughter of James Taylor, Jr., and Martha Thompson, on 24 August 1721. Frances Taylor, his wife, was born on August 30, 1700. He died on 27 August 1732, a resident of Spotsylvania Co., VA.

He and Frances Taylor were the grandparents of James Madison, President of the United States. a. In 1717 James Millener wrote a promissory note to Ambrose Madison dated "this 13th Day 1717," with no month given. ["Shane Collection" in the Madison Family Papers, located at the Presbyterian Historical Society, Philadelphia, PA (MS.Sh18M265.1)] (1) On the assumption that Ambrose Madison was age 21 when he received this promissory note, he would have been born about 1696. b. There is a “Sarah Catlett (Madison) Macon Bible” record[5] (a digital image of which is viewable at the Virginia State Library website http://eagle.vsla.edu/cgi-bin/bible.gateway?bib=0006-28660&conf=010000 which contains the following relevant entries about Ambrose Madison and his descendants (there is no information about his ancestors):

(1) Ambrose Madison was married to Frances Taylor on August the 24th 1721. (2) Ambrose Madison and Frances Taylor had the following children: (a) JamesMadison was born March 27, 1723, and was baptized April 21 and had Godfathers Thomas Madison & James Taylor & for Godmothers Martha Taylor & Elizabeth Penn. (b) Elizabeth Madison was born June 14th 1725 and was baptized July 3d had for Godfathers James Taylor & Richard Thomas and for Godmothers Martha Taylor and Elinor Madison. (c) Frances Madison was born March 6th 1726 (1726/27) and was baptized April 9th & had for Godfather James Pendleton & for Godmothers Isbell Pendleton & Elizabeth Penn. (3) Ambrose Madison departed this Life August 27, 1732 being Sunday Night. c. Ambrose Madison’s Will: In the Name of God Amen. I Ambrose Madison of the parish of St. Mark in the County of Spotsylvania, being of Sound Mind & perfect Memory, do make this my last will and Testament in a Manner and form following: Imprimis, I recommend my pretious and immortal soul into the hands of my great Creator, and blessed Redemer, and my body to the Earth to be decently intered at the discreton of my Executors & Executrix herein after named, as to my temporoll estate which it has pleased god to bless me, I give and bequeath (Viz). Item – I give and bequeath unto James Coleman and his wife, Elender Six hundred acres of land, (according to Survay Made be the same more or less,) adjoyning to the sd Coleman’s plantation at the little Mountains, to him and his wife dureing their naturall lifes, and from and after their decease to the heirs of the body of the said Elender, lawfully begotten, or to be begotten, and for want of such ishue to return * * * my heirs. Item – I give and bequeath unto Francis W* * *mes two hundred acres of land * * *ing as its laid of adjoyning to his plantation at the great Mountains to him and his his heirs for Ever. Item – I give and bequeath unto Danell Stoghill, one hundred and and fifty acres of land begining at a red oak standing in David William’s and Abraham Estridge’s line, runing along the said Abraham’s line, so far as to lay of the said land square to him and his heirs for ever. Item – I give and bequeath unto David Roach on hundred and fifty acres of land, to be laid of some part of my land which I have in company with George Braxton, Gentlen and others, According to the discretion of my Executors hearin after named , to him & his heirs for Ever. Item – I give and bequeath unto my daughter Elizabeth one thousand acres of land adjoying to the said above Mentioned land of James Coleman, to begin at my uper line, and to run down to the lower line, and also one Thousand acres of land at the Great Mountains lying between land now belonging to John Camm Gentlen and my son James to her and her heirs for Ever. Item – I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Frances one thousand acres of land adjoying to her sister Elizabeth’s, at the little Mountains, and also one thousand acres of land at the Great Mountains lyeing between the land of my son James on the one side and land of Abraham Estridge of the other side, to her and her heirs for Ever. I give and bequeath unto my son James, all other My lands whatsoever that I am possessed of to him & his heirs for Ever, and that possess the same when he shall arrive to Eighteen years of age. Item – I lend unto my Dear and well beloved wife Francis all and Singular my reall and parsonall estate not before bequeathed, for and Dureing the time she shall continue a widow, or untill one of my Children shall Marry, at either of which times the hole of the Estate that I have lent to My wife shall be Devided as the law Directs. Item – I do hereby Constitute & Opoint my loveing wife, my Brother John Madison, Mr. Francis Conway and Joseph Brock Excutors and Exceutrix, of this my last will and Testament, and do hereby revoke and Make void all other wills by me heartofore Made in testimony whereof I have hearunto Set my hand and fix’d my Seal this 31st day of July 1732. /SS/ Ambrose Madison [Seal] Signed, sealed, published and declared in the presence of us. James BarbourRobt MartinGeorge Penn At a court held for Spotsylvania County, Virginia, Tuesday, February 6th 1732 [1732/33]. This will being exhibited and sworn to by Frances Madison one of the executrixs within named was proved by the oaths of James Barbour and George Penn and admitted to record. [Source: This is a compilation of three versions of the Will, The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 6 (1899), pages 434-435, Spotsylvania Co., VA Will Book A, page 72 (a portion of the will is missing from the Will book), A copy of the Will found in the records of the Willis family of Orange County, VA (formerly lodged at the James Madison Museum in Orange Co., VA, now at the Orange County Historical Society). This version of the Will is printed in The Virginia Genealogist, Vol. 26 (1982), pages 286-287] d. On 15 November 1723 Ambrose Madison “of King & Queen County”, VA and Thomas Chew “Spotsylvania County”, VA received a 4675 acre land patent in Spotsylvania Co., VA (Patent Book 11, page 294). (1) On 26 May 1737, Thomas Chew "of Orange County, Gent." deeded 2850 acres of this 4675 acres patent to Frances Maddison, widow and James Maddison, son and heir of Ambrose Maddison, deceased. Frances Madison's share was a life estate only and then to James Madison. The deed says "Ambrose Maddison departed this life before any legal division of the land was made, by which the whole was vested in Thomas Chew as survivor. Thomas Chew hath reserved to himself 1825 acres adjacent to Mr. John Scott" and the residue of the 4675 acres. The remaining 2850 acres adjoins the land of John Baylor and the Octuna (?) tract and Col. William Todd's land. /s/ Thomas Chew. Witnesses were William Waller and J. Lewis. Acknowledged by Thomas Chew on 26 May 1737. On motion of George Taylor, admitted to record. [Orange County, VA, Deed Book 2, page 10-13] e. On 9 July 1724 Peter Rogers of King & Queen Co., VA received a land patent of 400 acres in St. John’s Parish, King William Co., VA, on the North side of Middle River, adjacent to Harry Beverley and Ambrose Maddison (Patent Book 12, page 46). 6. There is an Ambrose Madison Account Book for 1725-1726 which is part of the Shane Collection lodged with the Presbyterian Historical Society in Philadelphia, PA. It shows that Ambrose Madison was some type of merchant with many accounts. About 200 different names are listed (some repeated). Among them are the following people: John Pen, Sr., John Penn, Jr., George Penn, James Pendleton, Collo James Taylor, James Taylor, Jr., John Taylor, William Tayloe, John Madison, Thomas Madison, Mrs. Isabelle Madison, Edward Eastham and Richard Gregory. 7. In 1726, Ambrose Madison, was listed as a Justices in King & Queen Co., VA. [Source: Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Fleet, Vol. II, page 245; English Duplicates of Lost Virginia Records, Louis des Cognets, Jr., (1958), page 35] 8. On 6 July 1726 Maj. William Todd, Gent., of King & Queen Co., VA received a land patent of 4675 acres of land in St. George’s Parish, Spotsylvania Co., VA on the South side of Rapidan River, adjacent to Poison Fields, Taliaferro’s Run and Ambrose Maddison’s land (Patent Book 12, page 423). 9. On 4 July 1727 Maj. Augustine Smith of Spotsylvania Co., VA deeded 863 acres in Spotsylvania Co., VA to Ambrose Madison of King & Queen Co., VA, part of a patent to Augustine Smith dated 1 August 1727. The witnesses were John Chew, Robert Brooke and P. Greenhill. [Spotsylvania County, VA, Deed Book A] 10. On 7 November 1727 Ambrose Madison and Frances, his wife, of Drysdale Parish, King & Queen Co., VA, deeds this 863 acres in St. George’s Parish, Spotsylvania Co., VA to Humphrey Bell of London, Merchant. Witnesses were John Waller, Zachary Lewis, Robert Green. [Spotsylvania County, VA, Deed Book A] 11. On 7 August 1728 Ambrose Madison and Thomas Chew witnessed the deed of Henry Willis of King & Queen Co., VA to Thomas Beale of Richmond County, VA of 3333 acres on the East side of the Little Mountains in St. George’s Parish, Spotsylvania Co., VA. [Spotsylvania County, VA, Deed Book A] 12. On 28 September 1728, James Madison[6] of King & Queen Co., VA, received a land patent of 1000 acres in Spotsylvania Co., VA, adjacent to Capt. John Madison, Erasmus Taylor, Henry Madison, Erasmus Taylor and Thomas Hamms. [Patent Book 12, page 351] (1) This patent was to the son of Ambrose Madison who was only age 5 at the time of receiving this land patent. As odd as this may seem, there is no other James Madison that can be found to be the patentee. Furthermore, this land is between the two below mentioned patents to Henry Madison and Capt. John Madison who each deeded their land to the other two minor children (daughters) of Ambrose Madison in 1734. 13.

On 28 September 1728 Henry Madison, brother to Ambrose Madison, of King & Queen Co., VA, received a land patent of 1000 acres in Spotsylvania Co., VA, adjacent to James Madison, George Penn and Zachariao (Zachary) Taylor. [Patent Book 13, page 352] (1) On 4 November 1734, Henry Madison of St. John's Parish, King William Co., VA, deeded 1000 in St. Marks Parish, Spotsylvania Co., VA to his niece, Frances Madison, daughter of Ambrose Madison, deceased, which was the 1000 acres he patented on September 28, 1728, on the condition that at her deceased, her heirs shall deed 150 acres to Daniel Stodghill in fee simple. [Spotsylvania County Deed Book C] (2) Note: Frances Madison, daughter of Ambrose Madison, was age 7 at the time of acquiring title in 1734. This was the same 1000 acres at the Great Mountains that Ambrose Madison provided to go to his daughter, Frances Madison, in his Will. It seems that Ambrose Madison felt that he owned this land and was able to control it by his Will despite the fact that it appeared to be patented to his brother, Henry Madison, in 1728, before he wrote his Will. (3) Note: It appears that Ambrose Madison needed to provide for somebody to oversee and seat this land while Frances was too young to tend to this herself. So, he engaged Daniel Stodghill to do this for which Daniel Stodghill was to be paid 150 acres according to Ambrose Madison’s Will (that was not to be paid until the death of Frances Madison according to the 1734 Deed from Henry Madison). (4) On April 25, 1754, Taverner Beale, Gent., and Frances, his wife, of orange County, VA, deeded 150 acres to Daniel Stoghill, taylor, of Essex Co., VA, part of a patent for 1000 acres granted to Henry Madison and by him acknowledged to the said Frances as Frances Madison, daughter of Ambrose Madison, deceased, it being at the Great Mountains in Orange County, on both sides of Swift Run. [Orange Co., VA, Deed Book 12, page 230] (a) Apparently Daniel Stodgell immediately thereafter sold the land to William Riddle of Orange Co., VA. (5) On 15 December 1760, Frances Beale, widow, deeded 1000 acres in Orange Co., VA, to James Madison and Richard Beale, Gentlemen, in trust, land whereon the grantor, Frances Beale, widow, now lives and being the same which was given to her by her father, Ambrose Madison by his last Will and Testament dated 31 July 1732 and remaining of record in Spotsylvania County, Virginia. The trust gives the beneficial use of the land to Frances Beale, widow, during her lifetime and on her death to Taverner Beale, eldest son and heir apparent to the said Frances Beale. [Orange Co., VA, Deed Book 13, page 183] (a) Note: Frances Beale was about to remarried to Jacob Hite and she created the trust to prevent the lands from coming under the control of Jacob Hite and to protect the inheritance of her children eldest son by her first husband. 14. On 28 September 1728 (Capt.) John Madison, brother to Ambrose Madison, of King & Queen Co., VA, received a land patent of 1000 acres in Spotsylvania Co., VA, adjacent to Capt. John Camms, George Taylor, James Madison and Erasmus Taylor. [Patent Book 13, page 350] (1) On 4 November 1734 John Madison of Drysdale Parish, King & Queen, Co., VA, deeded 1000 acres in St. Mark's Parish, Spotsylvania Co., VA, to his niece, Elizabeth Madison, eldest daughter of my brother, Ambrose Madison, lately deceased, which was the 1000 acres he patented on 28 September 1728, on the condition that upon her deceased that 200 acres be deeded to Francis Williams in fee simple. [Spotsylvania Co., VA, Deed Book C] (2) Note: Elizabeth Madison, daughter of Ambrose Madison, was age 9 at the time of acquiring title in 1734. This was the same 1000 acres at the Great Mountains that Ambrose Madison provided to go to his daughter, Elizabeth Madison, in his Will. It seems that Ambrose Madison felt that he owned this land and was able to control it by his Will despite the fact that it appeared to be patented to his brother, John Madison, in 1728, before he wrote his Will. (3) Note: It appears that Ambrose Madison needed to provide for somebody to oversee and seat this land while Elizabeth was too young to tend to this herself. So, he engaged Francis Williams to do this for which Francis Williams was to be paid 200 acres according to Ambrose Madison’s Will (that was not to be paid until the death of Elizabeth Madison according to the 1734 Deed from John Madison). (4) On 23 July 1761, Richard Beale and Elizabeth, his wife, of St. Thomas Parish, Orange co., VA deeded 800 acres to George Bruce located in Orange Co., VA, being part of 1000 acres granted to John Madison, Gent., of King & Queen County by patent dated 28 September 1728 in the present parish of St. Thomas and the County of Orange and adjoining the lands of Capt. John Camm, George Taylor, James Madison, Erasmus Taylor and this land was given and confirmed unto the grantor as Elizabeth Madison and to her heirs forever only expecting 200 acres to be made sure in fee simple to Frances William and his heirs and assigns forever and said Francis Williams being now possessed of the same which said gift and proviso being made by the said John Madison, Gent., to the said Elizabeth Madison per record of Spotsylvania County. [Orange Co., VA Deed Book 13, page 195] (a) On 18 February 1758, Francis Williams deeded 100 acres of 200 acres “which the said Francis Williams had from Mr. Ambrose Madison” and bounded by the lands of Colonel George Taylor and others. [Orange County, VA, Deed Book 12, page 436] (b) On 18 February 1758 Frances Williams deeded 100 acres of 200 acres to his son Francis Williams of Orange Co., VA. This deed describes the land deeded to be part of the 200 acres he bought of Thomas Simms. [Orange Co., VA, Deed Book 12, page 437] This may or may not be the other 100 acres of the 1000 acres that was Ambrose Madison’s and then patented to John Madison, Gent., and then deeded by him to Elizabeth Madison who later married Richard Beale. 15. In 1729, Ambrose Madison, and Richard Madison were listed a Justices in Caroline Co., VA. [English Duplicates of Lost Virginia Records, Louis des Cognets, Jr., (1958), page 44] 16. On 28 September 1730 William Todd, Gent., of King & Queen Co., VA, received a land patent of 2621 acres in Spotsylvania Co., VA, adjacent to Ambrose Madison extending to Indian Cabin Run (Patent Book 13, page 478). 17. On 11 April 1732 Ambrose Madison, Col. George Braxton, Robert Brooke, William Brooke, Humphrey Brook and George Braxton, Jr., Gent., received a land patent of 10,000 acres in St. George’s Parish, Spotsylvania Co., VA, between the little mountains and the great mountains along the line of the land called “Octuna”, adjacent to Col. George Braxton (Patent Book 14, page 399). 18. On 14 February 1733/34 Henry Willis of Spotsylvania Co., VA, Gent., deeded 3034 acres in St. George’s Parish, Spotsylvania Co., VA, of his 10,000 acre patent dated 23 July 1728 to Thomas Hill. The Witnesses were Zachary Lewis, M. Battaley, Francis Thornton, Jr. and Anthony Rhodes, Jr. The deed mentions that Henry Willis’ Will previously devised 3333 acres of this land to Thomas Beale (see 7 August 1728 deed above), 3333 acres to Ambrose Madison and 300 acres to Goodrich Lightfoot. [Spotsylvania County, VA, Deed Book B] 19. On 4 November 1734 John Madison of Drysdale Parish, King & Queen Co., VA deeded “unto my well beloved niece, Elizabeth Madison, eldest daughter of my brother, Ambrose Madison, lately deceased,” 1000 acres granted to said John Madison by patent dated 28 September 1728 in St. Mark’s Parish, Spotsylvania Co., VA, on the condition that after she is 21, or at her decease, her heirs shall deed 200 acres of said land in fee simple to Francis Williams and his heirs. The Witness was Roger Tandy. [Spotsylvania County, VA, Deed Book B] 20. On 4 November 1734 Henry Madison of St. John’s Parish, King William Co., VA deeded “unto my well beloved niece, Elizabeth Madison, youngest daughter of my brother, Ambrose Madison, lately deceased,” 1000 acres granted to said Henry Madison by patent dated 28 September 1728 in St. Mark’s Parish, Spotsylvania Co., VA, on the condition that after she is 21, or at her decease, her heirs shall deed 150 acres of said land in fee simple to Daniel Stodghill and his heirs. The Witness was Roger Tandy. [Spotsylvania County, VA, Deed Book B] 25. Henry Madison: His birth date is uncertain. One would think that John Madison, Jr., his father, would have named a son “Henry” before naming a son “Thomas”. This suggests a birth date about 1690. On the other hand, there is no documentary reference of him before 1728 that suggest a birth date between 1700-1710. 1. On 28 September 1728 Henry Madison of King & Queen Co., VA, received a land patent of 1000 acres in Spotsylvania Co., VA, adjacent to James Madison, George Penn and Zachariao (Zachary) Taylor (Patent Book 13, page 352) (a) On 4 November 1734, Henry Madison of St. John’s Parish, King William Co., VA deeded 1000 acres in St. Marks Parish, Spotsylvania Co., VA to Frances Madison, youngest daughter of “my brother” Ambrose Madison, deceased which was the 1000 acres he patented 28 September 1728, but at her deceased, her heirs shall deed 150 acres to Daniel Stodghill in fee simple. [Spotsylvania County Deed Book C, page __] 2. In August 1757 in Lunenburg Co., VA., "Isabell Madison, orphan of Henry Madison, deceased," chose Tschner Degraffenreid to be her guardian. The security was George Waller. On the same date "Henry Madison, orphan of Henry Madison, deceased," chose Roger Madison to be his guardian. The security was Daniel Claibourne. [Lunenburg Co., VA Court Order Book 4, page 335]. (1) These records prove that these children were at least 14 years of age to be able to choose their own guardian. It is not known when and where the father, Henry Madison, died. This guardianship might have been necessary because Henry Madison's widow, Elizabeth Coleman, died or remarried or if Henry outlived his wife, it could have been on Henry Madison's death. 3. On June 9, 1809, Josiah Jackson, grandson-in-law of Henry Madison, wrote a letter to President James Madison that says, in part: "....The head of which is an Old Gentleman by the name of Henry Madison about 65 years of age who is son of Henry Madison who has been long dead, I believe of Caroline, he I understand was Brother to your GrandFather Ambrose. This old gentleman has resided in the county of Charlotte upwards of 40 years on the waters of Stanton River, near Rough Creek Church. He married about the time he settled here to one Martha White late of Hanrico. They have rais'd a large family Black & white, Eleven children of ther own 4 sons & 7 Daughters...." [Published in the Madison papers. Robert A. Rutland, Robert J. Brugger, Jeanne K. Sisson, Thomas A. Mason, Susannah H. Jones, Fredrika J. Teute, ed., The Papers of James Madison Presidential Series Volume 1 1 March-30 September 1809, (Charlottesville: University Press of VA., ) pp. 217-219.] (1) If this account is accurate, that would make Henry Madison, "an Old Gentleman", son of Henry Madison, the brother of Ambrose Madison (grandfather of President James Madison, Jr.) alive in 1809 and born about 1744.[7] 26. Eleanor Madison, born about 1704. She was listed as a Godmother to the baptism of Elizabeth Madison, daughter of Ambrose Madison and Frances Taylor, who was born on 14 June 1725 and baptized on 3 July 1725 according to the Ambrose Madison Bible. She married James Coleman before 31 July 1732 in Spotsylvania Co., VA. She died before 22 February 1758 in Orange Co., VA.[8] 27. Roger Madison, born before 1714, died after 1789 in Halifax Co., VA. His alleged relationship to John Madison, Jr., still requires documentation.[9] 1. On 14 March 1734/35, Roger Madison served on a Jury in Caroline Co., VA [Caroline Co., VA Court Order Book 1732-1740, page __] This is the earliest reference of Roger Madison in Caroline Co., VA. 2. On _________, 1734-1736, Roger Madison acknowledged a deed of lease and release to Benjamin Rennolds in Caroline Co., VA [Caroline Co., VA Court Order Book 1732-1740, page __] 3. On August 31, 1741 Duncon Bohannon or Caroline Co., VA, deeded 342 acres to John Baylor, Gent., of Caroline Co., VA adjacent to line Thomas Madison and land of Roger Madison, line of John Baylor being also John Pickett's corner (in exchange for land from Baylor to Bohannon located in Orange Co., VA). [Orange County Deed Book __, 1741-1743, page __] (1) On 14 June 1753, Roger Madison and Elizabeth, his wife, acknowledged a deed of lease and release of land in Caroline Co., VA, to Robert Taliaferro, Gent. [Caroline Co., VA Court Order Book 1746-1754, page __] (2) On 15 Feb. 1754/55 and 15 March 1754/55, there is mention of a lawsuit of Roger Madison against Robert and John Taliaferro on an obligatory note in Caroline Co., VA. [Caroline Co., VA Court Order Book 1746-1754, page __] This is the last identifiable reference to Roger Madison in the Caroline Co., VA Court Order Books. (3) On 15 June 1755, William Waller, Gent., involved in lawsuit against the estate of Roger Madison. Waller proved his account. This reference is either related to Roger Madison intending to leave the county and the law allowing sort of a writ of attachment for moneies owing by a person leaving the county, or it may be related to Roger Madison, son of Thomas Madison, involving a guardianship of Roger Madison, a minor, after the death of his father. (4) In August 1757 in Lunenburg Co., VA., "Isabell Madison, orphan of Henry Madison, deceased," chose Tschner Degraffenreid to be her guardian. The security was George Waller. On the same date "Henry Madison, orphan of Henry Madison, deceased," chose Roger Madison to be his guardian. The security was Daniel Claibourne. [Lunenburg Co., VA Court Order Book 4, page 335]. These records prove that these children were at least 14 years of age to be able to choose their own guardian. It is not known when and where the father, Henry Madison, died. Henry Madison, the ward, was Roger Madison's nephew, son of Henry Madison, Roger Madison's brother. (5) On 19 June 1777 there is a deed in Halifax Co., VA from Spilsby Tribble of Halifax Co., VA to Roger Madison of "Charlotte County", VA, involving 100 acres adjacent to John Dyer, Daniel Nanney?, Thomas Daugherty?. (6) On April 8, 1789, Roger Madison "of the County of Halifax”, wrote his Will. It was Recorded on 25 February 1802. He mentions his children as follows: Ann Cox, Mary Collins, Elizabeth Moore, Frances Collins, Peggy French Madison, son-in-law George Richards and grandson Taliaferro Richards (deceased daughter's name not mentioned), grandson Taliaferro Cox (either a son of Ann Cox or an unnamed deceased daughter), and Ambrose Madison. The executors were Ambrose Madison and "my nephew George Camp.[10]" Witnesses were Ben Lankford, William Jackson and Moses Lawson. Children of Henry Madison 28. There is no direct evidence that Henry Madison, son of John Madison, Sr., was married or had children. The following circumstantial evidence suggests that he may have had children. The other possibility is that he died without children and his King William Co., VA, real property was inherited by his brother, John Madison, Jr., or his nephews (sons of John Madison, Jr.). Keep in mind that Henry Madison’s neighbors in 1702-1704 in King William Co., VA were George Pemberton and John Williams and that John William sold his land in 1722 to John and William Lipscomb. 1. There is a Henry Madison of King William Co., VA who was born no later than about 1725. He had one proven child, John Madison, who died in 1797 in King William Co., VA. He died in King William Co., VA between 1788-1789. He appeared in the 1788 King William Co., VA, personal property tax list and his widow, Mildred, appeared in the 1789 King William Co., VA personal property tax list and Henry Madison disappears from the tax list in 1789. He had a son John Madison who died in King William Co., VA, in 1797. There are existing deeds and deed fragments for King William Co., VA in 1797 that show that the children of John Madison were Polly Pemberton Madison, Ambrose Madison, Garland Madison and Martha Madison who all inherited land that was possessed by their father, John Madison, during his lifetime that John Madison inherited by the Will of his father, Henry Madison, and that by the terms of Henry Madison’s Will, became the property of John Madison’s children upon the death of John Madison. The four children of John Madison appear to sign their own deeds without guardians. That means that the oldest was born about 1770, meaning that John Madison, their father was born about 1745-1750, meaning that Henry Madison, was born no later than about 1725. The fact that John Madison’s oldest child, Polly, had “Pemberton” as a middle name suggests a possible connection to George Pemberton who was an adjacent owner to Henry Madison, Sr., in 1704. Still, The Henry Madison born no later than about 1725 seems to be at least two generations away from Henry Madison, Sr., who was an adult in King William Co., VA between 1702-1706. The Pemberton connection with Polly Pemberton Madison, suggest connections between the Henry Madison who was born about 1725 and Thomas Pemberton Madison mentioned below, perhaps another son of said Henry Madison. 2. The 1782 King William Co., VA, personal property tax list lists P. Thomas Madison. The1787 King William Co., VA, personal property tax list and real property tax list lists Thomas P. Madison. The 1788 King William Co., VA, personal property tax list lists Pemberton Madison. The 1789 King William Co., VA, personal property tax list lists Thomas Penbro Madison. Thereafter Thomas and/or Pemberton Madison disappears from the available personal property tax lists for King William Co., VA, through 1800. 3. The 1787 King William Co., VA, real property tax list lists Madison Lipscomb being taxed for 187 acres. The 1797 King William Co., VA real property tax list lists Madison Lipscomb being taxed for 107 acres. d. On 30 May 1792, there was a Decree made in the King William Co., VA, Court involving a lawsuit of Elizabeth Breedlove, and infant under the age of twenty one years, by William Waide, her guardian & next friend, plaintiff, vs. Mary Seay, Henry Madison, Marinnia Breedlove, William Breedlove, John Breedlove, Lucy Leigh & Mildred Madison, defendants. The case was dismissed against Mary Seay and Henry Madison and _____ Breedlove by their deaths. (1) The 1787 King William Co., VA, personal property tax list lists a Mildred Seay and Joseph Seay and a William Breedlove. The 1787 King William Co., VA, real property tax list lists as William Breedlove being taxed on 150 acres. e. Apparently John Lipscomb (circa 1725-1777) of King William Co., VA married Ann Madison, alleged to probably be the daughter of Thomas P. (Pemberton?) Madison. She is closely related to Mary Madison who married Philip Lipscomb. After John Lipscomb died, leaving Ann (Madison) Lipscomb a widow, she married George Lipscomb, brother of her deceased husband. [Lipscomb 200 Years in America 1679-1979, by Dorothy Garr Helmer (1979), page 423] From the Will of John Lipscomb written 5 December 1776, it is learned that he and Ann were the parents of Pemberton Lipscomb, John Lipscomb, Elizabeth Lipscomb, Ann Lipscomb, Henry Lipscomb, Sally Lipscomb, Madison Lipscomb, Martha Lipscomb, Reuben Lipscomb, Anderson Lipscomb and Patsy Lipscomb. Henry and Sally appear to be between age 18-21 in December 1776. Martha Reuben, Anderson and Patsy appear to be under age 18 in December 1776. f. There is a Dennis McCarty who was an adjacent land owner to a 815 acre land patent to Edward Ware in Stratton Major Parish, King & Queen Co., VA, on 22 June 1722. This land patent says that this land was formerly patented to John Madison on 4 July 1664 and that 415 acres was sold by Henry Madison to Nicholas Ware, father of Edward Ware, on 29 November 1680. [Patent Book 11, page 10] Apparently, there is a 2 January 1745/46 Caroline Co., VA, Court Order Book reference to a deed from Elizabeth McCarty, widow of Dennis McCarty, of 200 acres in St. Margaret’s Parish, Caroline Co., VA to her son, William Madison. This land was land formerly owned by Elizabeth’s deceased husband, Dennis McCarty. There is apparently something in the references to the Will of Dennis McCarty dated 28 January 1733 and of his dying shortly thereafter. On 13 June 1746 there is a Caroline Co., VA, Court Order Book reference to Elizabeth McCarty’s deed of lease and release of land indented to William Madison that was proved by William Dygar, Dygar and Roger Quarles, witnessed thereto [Dorman, comp., Caroline County, Virginia Order Book, 1740-1746, Part Three 1744-1746, page 72 (Washington, D.C. Privately Published; 1973]. Who was this Elizabeth __?__/Madison/McCarty previously married to before she married Dennis McCarty and who was the father of at least William Madison. This Mr. Madison appears to be related in some way to the Madison above-mentioned Madisons. Other 17th Century Madisons in Virginia 29. John Maddison of York Co., VA in the 1740s. York Co., VA was the parent county of New Kent Co., VA. These references could relate to John Maddison, Sr., above or to the John Maddison who died in Westmoreland Co., VA in 1659 (see below) or possibly (by unlikely) a 3rd John Maddison. (1) On 2 February 1645/46 a Court was held in York Co., VA where the Will of Humphrey Hanmore referenced a sow which was bequeathed to John Madison. (2) On 25 July 1646, a Court was held in York Co., VA where the Will of Christopher Stookes of New Pawquoron in Charles River Co., VA dated 8 June 1646 was proved. The Will mentions his wife and siblings. The witnesses to the Will were John Madison, Richard Watkins and Edward Watts. On the same date there is reference to a debt owing to John Maddeson by the estate of Edward Percival related to ½ of a heifer. (3) At a Court held on 6 December 1648 in York Co., VA, there was a bond given by Thomas Privitt, binding himself to pay John Madison 600 pounds of tobacco before 1 October 1649, giving a steer and a heifer as security. 30. John Maddison of Westmoreland Co., VA: 1. On 5 March 1658/59 John Maddison received a 300 acre land patent in Westmoreland Co., VA on the South side of the Patomeck River, adjacent to another track in occupation of said John Hallowes granted to John Hallowes on 6 September 1654 (Book 4, page 369). 2. On 10 Nov. 1659 John Maddison wrote his Will, proved 10 January 1659/60 in Westmoreland Co., VA. It mentions his brother (brother-in-law?) Thomas Perkins, Aunt Grace Isham, John Biddle and brother Edward Maddison. [Source: Virginia County Records, by Crozier, New Series, Vol. I, Westmoreland County, VA Wills]. 31. John Maddison on Rappahannock River: 1. On 4 November 1642, John Maddison received a land patent of 1400 acres, 900 acres of which was assigned by Capt. Thomas Burbage (John Maddison appears to be part of the assigned headrights), on the Rappahannock River about 35 miles up on the North side (Patent Book 1, page 847-848). This Patent was assigned by Capt. Daniell Gookins to Thomas Burbage on 6 April 1648 (witnesses were John Hopkens and John Browne). Other headrights were Capt. Daniell Gookins two times, Mrs. Mary Gookins and Samuel Gookins. (1) Note: This could be John Maddison, Sr., who ended up in York Co., VA in the mid-1640s or he could be John Maddison of Westmoreland Co., VA or both. It is unlikely that he is a 3rd John Maddison. 32. Isaac Madison: 1. “At a Courte Held in Ye afternoon of ye 13th of December, 1620, Captain Madison having been heretofore twelve years together in Virginia and there employed by Sr. Thomas Dale (The Gouvernor) in discovereing the said Countrye and severall rivers therein; did not petition that he might returne to the colony and proceed in a further Discovering Comodious places for habitatons within the land. The Court thereupon ordered that he should be treated with by the committees both for the manner of his discovery as also to makeit to appeare what the charge therof will be unto the Company,” [Records of the Virginia Company, I, page 438] 2. On 4 June 1623, there was an examination of Isack Madeson about the supposed contract of marriage between Grivell Pooley and Mrs. Sysley Jordan, 3. On 23 July 1623, there is a reference to Capt. Isaack Madison marching against the great Weyonacques a week before. [Virginia Colonial Records Project at the Virginia State Library] 4. On 28 October 1623, a Warrant was issued to Capt. Madison to recruit 40 men from the plantation under his control (Flowerdieu Hundred upward) and to muster the men in James City by November 3rd for an attack on the Indians. [Virginia Colonial Records Project at the Virginia State Library] 5. On 20 November 1623, a Warrant was issued to Isaac Madison to organize a levy on tobacco, corn and sassafras in all plantations above Flowerdieu Hundred. 6. Isack Maddeson (Capt.) was listed among the dead at West & Sherley and at Sherley Hundred in VA in 1624. [Source: Adventurers of Purse and Person, by ____, page 16] (1) Note: Some genealogical charts claim that this Isaac Maddeson was the father of John Maddeson, Sr., one of the subjects of this article. This allegation is unproven and, to this author, seems very questionable. 33. Edward Maddison: 1. On 12 December 1650, Edward Maddison was a headright of Wingfield Webb(e) and Richard Pate who received a land patent of 1141 acres on the North side of the York River lying on an Eastward branch of the Poropotank River (Patent Book 2, page 271). Other headrights were Thomas Perkins and Jane Perkins. 2. On 10 Nov. 1659 John Maddison wrote his Will, proved 10 January 1659/60 in Westmoreland Co., VA. It mentions his brother (brother-in-law?) Thomas Perkins, Aunt Grace Isham, John Biddle and brother Edward Maddison. [Source: Virginia County Records, by Crozier, New Series, Vol. I, Westmoreland County, VA Wills]. 34. Thomas Maddison: a. On 18 May 1658 John Simpson and Ann, his wife sold 600 acres of land in Lancaster Co., VA, to Moore Price and Thomas Maddison (Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Fleet, Vol. I, page 124). b. On 9 Feb. 1658/59 Vincent Stanford & Mary, his wife sold 400 acres and cattle in Lancaster Co., VA. A witness to the deed was Thomas Maddison (Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Fleet, Vol. I, page 125). Thomas Maddison also witnessed a deed of cattle by Vincent Sanford on the same date. c. On 30 March 1659 Thomas Maddeson and Moore Price acknowledge a bill of sale of a house in Lancaster Co., VA unto John Simpson, recorded 1 April 1659 in Lancaster Co., VA (Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Fleet, Vol. I, page 129). d. On 6 July 1659 Capt. David Mansell sold 460 acres of land to Thomas Maddison and John Scott [(Old) Rappahannock Co., VA, Deed Book __, page ___] e. On 30 Oct. 1659 Thomas Maddison and John Scott witnessed a deed from Capt. David Mansell of 270 acres to John Chin, Quintyn Sherman and Thomas Dean. [(Old) Rappahannock Co., VA, Deed Book __, page __] f. On 20 November 1659 Moore Price of Lancaster Co., VA, gives a Power of Attorney to “my loving friend” Thomas Maddeson to acknowledge a deed of land that he and Thomas Maddeson formerly bought of John Simpson. The witness was Raleigh Travers. Recorded in Lancaster Co., VA on 30 November 1659 (Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Fleet, Vol. I, page 133). g. On 6 March 1661/62 John Scott assigned his interest in the 460 acres to Thomas Madyson. [(Old) Rappahannock Co., VA, Deed Book __, page ___] h. On 26 May 1661 Thomas Maddison and Anna, his wife, of Farnham Creek, carpenter, deeded 250 acres Richard Powell lying towards the head of said Creek, adjacent to Mr. Thomas Griffith, deceased, the land of Madyson in breath and in length, along the marked trees of John Scott. This land was land that Thomas Maddison had acquired from David Mansell. The witnesses were Robert Bedwell and William Field. [(Old) Rappahannock Co., VA, Deed Book __, page __] i. On 30 April 1662 Thomas Pattison and Anne, his wife, of the County of Rappahannock deeded land to Henry Nicholas of Lancaster Co., VA. A witness to the deed was Thomas Maddeson. Recorded on 10 September 1662 (Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Fleet, Vol. I, page 140). j. On 13 May 1663 Ennis Macenicee sold a portion of his land (acreage unspecified) in Lancaster Co., VA, that he formerly acquired (along with Robert Ross) from John Simpson (being part of John Simpson’s 600 acres). Robert Ross had sold his share to Ennis Macenicee and Ennis Macenicee also sold part of the land to John Adamson on 13 May 1663. [Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Fleet, Vol. I, page 143] k. On 14 July 1663 Thomas Maddeson and Thomas Elvert received a land patent of 606 acres (county unstated) on the North side of the Rappahannock County (River?), adjacent to Richard Merryman (Patent Book 5, page 93). l. On 24 July 1664 Thomas Maddison and his wife Ann Maddason assigned this Patent to David Burke. The witnesses were Thomas Elvart and William Hill. Recorded 15 Nov. 1666. [(Old) Rappahannock Co., VA Deed Book __, page __] m. On 17 November 1670 Thomas Elvar received a land patent of 303 acres in Rappahannock Co., VA, adjacent to David Birke, part of 606 acres granted to Elvar and Thomas Maddison on 8 July 1663 with is now divided (Patent Book 6, page 342). n. On 17 November 1670 David Birke received a land patent of 303 acres in Rappahannock Co., VA, land formerly granted to Thomas Elvar and Thomas Maddison, Maddison having sold to Birke on 24 July 1664 (Patent Book 6, page 345). o. On 29 June 1668 Thomas Maddyston and Ann, his wife, of the County of Rappahannock, Carpenter deeded 100 acres to John Killingarr adjacent to Thomas Elver and Thomas Maddison. Recorded 1 July 1668 [(Old) Rappahannock Co., VA, Deed Book __, page __] p. On 5 Nov. 1668 Thomas Maddison and Anne, his wife, deeded _?_ acres of land to Thomas Powell and Richard Syms. The witnesses were John Samwaies and Thomas Chetwoode. Recorded 3 Feb. 1668/69. Apparently this was again recorded on 1 October 1669. Apparently this was again recorded on 2 November 1681. [(Old) Rappahannock Co., VA, Deed Book __, page __] q. On 7 November 1668 Thomas Maddison of Rappahannock County in Virginia, Carpenter, sold _?_ acres of land to Adam Griffins, adjacent to Richard Simms. The witnesses were Richard Simms and John Killingar. The Deed was recorded on 3 Feb. 1668/69. [(Old) Rappahannock Co., VA, Deed Book __, page __ r. On 5 April 1670 Mr. Thomas Maddyson (Maddison) received a land patent of 1198 acres in Rappahannock Co., VA on the main branch of Moratico (sold to Maddison by John Carpenter, Milhill Miller and Charles Carpenter on 4 April 1670 (Patent Book 6, page 339) s. On 17 November 1670 Thomas Maddison received three land patents in Rappahannock Co., VA, 200 acres, 100 acres and 250 acres (Patent Book 6, page 340). t. On 29 June 1672, Thomas Maddison assigned his 250 acres land patent to John Beforese. The witnesses were Peter Calvin and Daniel O’Neal. [(Old) Rappahannock Co., VA, Deed Book __, page __] u. On 31 December 1670 Thomas Maddison’s land is mentioned as adjacent to land being deeded from James Capline to Edward Ryley. Thomas Maddison also witnessed this deed. [(Old) Rappahannock Co., VA, Deed Book __, page __] v. In January 1670/71 Thomas Maddison witnessed a deed of 150 acres from John Killinghan to Richard White and George Vinson located in the Parish of Farnham at the head of Moratico Creek. [(Old) Rappahannock Co., VA, Deed Book __, page __] w. On 4 April 1671 John Carpenter of the County of Lancaster and Charles Carpenter of the County of Northumberland in Virginia, planters, sold 1198 acres of land in (Old) Rappahannock Co., VA, to Thomas Maddison of (Old) Rappahannock Co., VA, located at the head of Marratico Creek adjacent to William Matthews, Richard Goodman and Samuel Griffin. The witnesses were John Killingen and Peter Calums. This land was evidently sold or assigned by Thomas Maddison and Ann, his wife, Ann giving her Power of Attorney to John Killigen on 2 May 1671. x. On 25 April 1671 Thomas Maddison of Rappahannock County in Virginia acknowledged himself and his wife to have witnessed the deed from John Killangan to Richard White and George Vinson. The witnesses were John Killingan and Richard Goodman. The document was recorded on 3 May 1671. [(Old) Rappahannock Co., VA Deed Book __, page __]. y. On 29 April 1671, Thomas Maddison gave a heifer to Elizabeth Carpenter. The witnesses were John Killingan and Richard Goodman. The deed was recorded on 3 May 1671. [(Old) Rappahannock Co., VA, Deed Book __, page __] z. On 22 July 1672 John Byforest of the Parish of Farnham, County of Rappahannock, planter, deeded to Daniel O’Neale, ½ dividend of land in Richmond Co., VA, which I bought from Madison, adjacent to land of William Mathews and Thomas Maddeson (Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Fleet, Vol. I, page 248). aa. On 28 August 1674, Thomas Maddison and Ann, his wife, deeded 1048 acres of land in Rappahannock Co., VA on the head of Moratico Creek to John Purvis of London, mariner, being the plantation on which Thomas Maddison “now dwell”, the remaining part of a great tract of land granted to Thomas Maddison by patent dated 1 April 1670. The witnesses were Samuel Griffing, John Day and Leroy Griffing. On 16 September 1674 Anne Maddison gave a power of attorney to William Traverse to acknowledge her signature in court. This was witnessed by Henry Wilson and Sarah Griffin. All these documents were recorded in Rappahannock Co., VA on 21 October 1674. [(Old) Rappahannock Co., VA, Deed Book __, page __] bb. On 29 October 1674 Thomas Maddison of Rappahannock Co., VA wrote his Will, proved in Rappahannock Co., VA on 4 November 1674, in which he names his wife, Catherine/Katherine (money which I have in England with my brother Leonard Maddison). Executors were friends Richard White and Thomas Bryant. Witnesses were Peter Calvin and John Biforest. [Virginia County Records, Crozier, Vol. __, part __, page 10] cc. On 4 November 1674 this Will was admitted for probate and Col. William Travers (perhaps with a Power of Attorney) was appointed executor/administrator on behalf of Anne Maddison. [(Old) Rappahannock Co., VA, Deed Book __, page __] dd. On 23 April 1694 Thomas Dusin and Susanna, his wife, of Richmond Co., VA to William Norris of Northumberland Co., VA, blacksmith, deeded 100 acres in Richmond Co., VA on Totusky Creek, adjacent to William Matthews, line of John Dabley (formerly belonging to Thomas Madison, line of William Richardson (Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Fleet, Vol. I, page 248). ee. On 29 October 1696 Thomas Maddison was listed as a headright of Sir. William Skipwith, Baronet, who received a land patent of 710 acres in King & Queen Co., VA, adjacent to Dragon Swamp and John Richards (Patent Book 9, page 38). 30. Richard Maddison: 1. On 5 Nov. 1635 Richard Maddison was a headright of William Swan who received a land patent of 1200 acres in James City County, VA (Patent Book 1, page 293). 2. On 1 March 1638 Richard Maddison was a headright of Thomas Swann on behalf of his father, William Swan, who received a land patent of 1200 acres in James City Co., VA (Patent Book 1, page 625). 3. On 17 April 1669 Mr. Thomas Woodward received a land patent of 100 acres in Low Parish of Isle of Wight Co., VA, at Pagan Creek, adjacent to William Parrot, Capt. Anthony Fulgham and land in possession of Richard Madison, to “Iron Point” (Patent Book 6, page 216). 4. On 14 September 1670 Richard Madison received a land patent of 100 acres in Isle of Wight Co., VA which was formerly granted to Richard Madison, deceased, and it escheated (Patent Book 6, page 306). 5. On 16 October 1675 Richard Madison either died or wrote his Will in Isle of Wight Co., VA. His Will named his wife, Ann, and his daughter, Elizabeth Waugh, wife of John Waugh. The Will was proved in Court on 9 January 1676/77. Witnesses were John Burnett and John __?__. 31. Margaret Maddison: a. On 17 September 1657 Margaret Maddison was a headright of William Edwards, Gent., who, by assignment of Sir William Berkeley and then Col. William Clairborne, received a land patent of 490 acres in Surry Co., VA (Patent Book 4, page ___/120)[1] A possible candidate for her first husband is the “Mr. William Todd, dec.” who died between 1692-1695 and whose orphans, Margaret Todd and Frances Todd, received a land patent of 500 acres in Stratton Major Parish, King & Queen Co., VA, on 25 October 1695. [Patent Book 9, page 10] This patent says that the land was originally patented to “Mr. William Todd” (the father) on 29 April 1693 and this (1695) patent was necessary to insert a course boundary line omitted from the previous patents. This patent suggests that this William Todd did not have any sons at the time of his death or otherwise the patent would have likely gone to the son(s) instead of to his two daughters. The 29 April 1693 land patent to William Todd is located in Patent Book 8, page 266 and says that this patent followed an order of the General Court in James City, VA, on 24 October 1692. [2] This author has seen some undocumented genealogy reports that claim that two daughters, Ann Madison and Mary Madison, were the daughters of John Madison, Jr. One undocumented account says that Ann Madison was married three times, 1st to John Stodgill, 2nd to Daniel Stodgill and 3rd to Francis Williams and that she died after 1710 in Essex Co., VA. There are the two 1734 deeds from John Madison, Jr., and Henry Madison to the daughters of Ambrose Madison, with a residuary provision in one deed for Daniel Stodghill and a residuary provision in the other deed for Francis Williams. It is unlikely that both people were married to Ann Madison. Another account says that she was the daughter of John Maddison, Sr., born circa 1665, however this seem unlikely to this author. Ann’s existence and her husband(s), if any, still need to be proven. As for Mary Madison, one undocumented account says she was married to a Samuel Brockman and died in Orange Co., VA in 1776. Samuel Brockman, Sr., was born between 1680-1685 according to knowledgeable Brockman researcher. Based on this date, if Mary Madison, daughter of John Madison, Jr., was the wife of Samuel Brockman, she would have likely been born about 1685-1695. That would place her after Ann and before Thomas in this list of John Madison, Jr.’s, children. The same knowledgeable Brockman researcher (and this author) has not been successful is finding any primary source evidence to support the claim that Mary, wife of Samuel Brockman, was a Madison. There is also no pre-20th Century genealogy report that names Mary Madison as the wife of Samuel Brockman. [3] This is the first reference to John Madison in Caroline Co., VA. This seems significant in trying to identify “J. Madison”, the first child of Thomas Madison, mentioned in the Thomas Madison Bible, infra.[4] See footnote 2 above. It seems as if this eldest child of Thomas Madison was a son named John Madison. He would have been age 22 in March 1741/42 when John Madison of Caroline Co., VA, first appears in the Caroline Co., VA records. Thomas Madison is the son of John Madison and, if a common pattern for naming children was followed by Thomas Madison, he would have named his first son John. Thomas did not name any of his other 4 sons John, suggesting that he already used the name. Establishing that Thomas Madison’s eldest son was John Madison is significant in determining the true genealogy of John Madison who married Agatha Strother and who became the first clerk of the Court for Augusta Co., VA in 1745. The Court Order Book for Caroline Co., VA, 1740-1746, has an entry for the Court held on 11 March 1742/43 recommending Thomas Buckner, Thomas Johnson, Rice Curtis, James Taylor and John Madison for the Governor to add to the commission of the peace for this County. Then on 13 May 1743, Archibald McPherson, Rice Curtis and John Madison, Gent., are appointed to view the road from Johnson’s plantation by the Ridge over the Middle River. From this point in the Caroline Co., VA records, John Madison seems to always carry the title “Gent.” On 11 May 1744, John Madison, Gent., acknowledged his deeds of lease and release of land indented to Ellias Daniel. On 8 March 1744/45, Agatha Madison, wife of John Madison, Gent., acknowledged her right to the land her husband sold to Samuel Haws and Elijah Daniel. The last Caroline Co., VA, Court Order Book reference to John Madison, Gent.,(or any John Madisons) was on 13 September 1745. The Augusta Court was formed on December 9, 1745, and John Madison was appointed as the first Clerk. Augusta Co., VA. [Augusta Co., VA, Court Order Book I, page 1] The first Augusta County, VA, reference of John Madison's wife, Agatha, was in a Deed to Robert McClenachan, Gent., of 731 acres at the corner of Adam Thompson and John Ramsey and John Harvey. John Madison was listed as the father of a Thomas Madison who was baptized by the Rev. John Craig at the Tinkling Spring Presbyterian Church in Fisherville, Augusta Co., VA on October 1, 1746. [ The Tinkling Spring: Headwater of Freedom, by The Tinkling Spring Presbyterian Church (1954/1974] John Madison was described as "John Madison, Gent." Augusta County, VA, Deed Book 3, page 388. On November 18 1766, Thomas Madison qualified for and was appointed an attorney in Augusta Co., VA and on the same date John Madison, Jr., was appointed Deputy Clerk in Augusta Co., VA. [Augusta Co., VA., Court Order Book X, page 344] I would surmise that Thomas Madison and John Madison, Jr., were just coming of age in 1766 and that they were the two eldest sons of John Madison and Agatha Strother. This John Madison, who married Agatha Strother, died in Botetourt Co., VA, in 1784. Agatha Madison, widow of John Madison, was still alive in 1800.[5] Sarah Catlett (Madison) Macon was a sister of President James Madison. She died in on Tuesday the 17th (month no stated) “in the 80th year of her age” accoding to an obituary attached with the digital image of the bible at the Virginia State Library website. She was born on August 17, 1764, so shed died between 1743-1744..[6] He is the father of James Madison, Jr., President of the United States.[7] He (Henry Madison, “an Old Gentleman” must have been born in 1743 or before in order to be age 14 in 1757 and eligible to choose his own guardian as he did according to the Lunenburg Co., VA, Court Order Book reference (see above). [8] At this point, some undocumented accounts contend that there was a son, James Madison. This contention is based primarily on the fact that a James Madison received a land patent of 1000 acres of land in Spotsylvania Co., VA, on 28 September 1728 next to Henry Madison, Capt. John Madison, Erasmus Taylor and Thomas Hamm (Patent Book 12, page 351), Henry Madison and Capt. John Madison being the sons of John Mad(d)ison, Jr. The only James Madison proven to have been living at that time was the son of Ambrose Madison, born 27 March, 1723. As odd and unusual as it might seem for a 5 year old to be receiving a 1000 acre land patent in 1728, I think this is exactly what happened. I thank Margaret Amundson for opening my mind on this point. On 4 November 1734 Henry Madison deeded his 1000 acre land patent to Elizabeth Madison, minor daughter of his brother, Ambrose Madison (Spotsylvania Co., VA, Deed Book B, page ___). On 4 November 1734, Capt. John Madison deeded his 1000 acre land patent to Frances Madison, minor daughter of his brother, Ambrose Madison (Spotsylvania Co., VA, Deed Book B, page ___).

So, as of 1734, there were the three minor children of Ambrose Madison, each owing a parcel of land adjacent to the other.[9] There is a published history of “Blenheim” (a plantation name). According to W. Wayne Rogers (Hcfr2@aol.com) the house on this land was located on 2000 (2150) acres that was patented by” John Madison, Jr”., on 25 March 1725/26. “ John Madison, Jr”., who I am calling John Madison, III, sold (or devised) this land to Roger Madison who sold it to Robert Taliaferro in 1753. The assumption seems to be that the 14 June 1753 Caroline Co., VA, Court Order Book reference to a deed from Roger Madison to Robert Taliaferro involved the land that “Blenheim” was built on. Robert Taliaferro may have been the brother of Roger Madison's wife, Elizabeth Taliaferro. It was the Robert Taliaferro who married Jane Bankhead. They lived on the Blenheim land until Robert Taliaferro's death in 1789 and Jane (Bankhead) Taliaferro's death in 1832. This land was earlier patented in 1714 by John Madison, Jr., husband of Isabella Minor (?Todd?), father of John Madison, III. When it was repatented to John Madison, III, in 1725/26, it referred to the previous patent to his father,” John Madison, deceased”, and Daniel Coleman in 1714. John Madison, Jr., husband of Isabella Minor (?Todd?) was born about 1659. He would be age 54 if Roger Madison was born in 1713. Although Isabella could have been much younger and still of child bearing years, it seems more likely to this author that Isabella was closer in age to John Madison, Jr., and likely not capable of child bearing in 1713. It makes more sense to this author that this Roger Madison was not the son of John Madison and Isabella Minor (?Todd?). It seems to this author that Roger Madison may have instead been the son of John Madison, III (the patentee of the 2150 acres in 1725/26). If there was only evidence to explain how the land that was patented to John Madison, III, in 1725/26 got into the hands of Roger Madison. Was it a deed or devise of John Madison, III, to his brother (or ½ brother), Roger Madison or was it a deed or devise to his son, Roger Madison? [10] Apparently, George Camp’s father was John Camp. John Camp’s wife was Mary. The speculation is that Mary was a Madison. That would make her a sister to Roger Madison. Apparently, George Camp was born between 1717-1719. So if his wife, Mary, was a Madison, sister to Roger Madison, she would likely have been born between 1718-1722. So, if Roger Madison was a son of John Madison, Jr., and Isabella, this would mean that this couple had a younger daughter, Mary Madison, born no earlier than 1718 when John Madison, Jr., was 59 years old and Isabella, his wife, was even more likely to have been to old to bear children. Of course, Mary, wife of George Camp, could have been a son to a sibling of Elizabeth Taliaferro, wife of Roger Madison, and still be a nephew to Roger Madison. If Mary, wife of John Camp, was in fact a Madison, a sister to Roger Madison, this would provide additional support to the fact that both of them were the children of John Madison, III, rather than John Madison, Jr., and Isabella. One confusing fact is that George Camp, nephew of Roger Madison, apparently had a daughter named Isabella who may have been named for Isabella Minor (?Todd?), wife of John Madison, Jr. If this occurred, it would suggest a closer connection to Isabella Minor (?Todd?) than a great-great granddaughter.

MADISONS OF COLONIAL VIRGINIA
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 

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